Boston Avenue - CoreCivic

Federal BOP Reentry & Treatment Facility

Last Updated: May 24, 2019
Address
2727 Boston Ave, San Diego, CA 92113
Beds
120
County
San Diego
Security Level
MINIMUM - general
Phone
619-232-1066
Facility Type
Adult
Satellite View of Boston Avenue - CoreCivic

Boston Avenue - CoreCivic basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 619-232-1066

This facility is for adult inmates.

CAI - Boston Avenue - CoreCivic - Visitation and Inmate Information

Customer base: Federal Bureau of Prisons (male only) and San Diego County

Boston Avenue - CoreCivic - Inmate Reentry Preparation

CoreCivic strives to make that difference in the lives of the offenders in their care. Their approach is comprehensive. It features inmate programs that emphasize:
• Academic Education,
• Learning can be the passport to changing a person's life. In general, this is true for everyone, but for those who have been incarcerated, it can hold the key to personal transformation.
• It's been proven that people who participate in educational programs while in prison are much less likely to be re-arrested and find themselves incarcerated again. Earning an educational credential for inmates is about much more than a piece of paper. It represents the promise of a new, law-abiding life, one in which they can be gainfully employed, support their families and earn the respect of their communities.
Adult Basic Education
• The ability to read and write is essential. Reading is required to understand the world around us, and writing is a basic skill that helps us share information and ideas. For far too many inmates, the educational process hinges on its most basic step - the ability to read and write. In addition to our own educators, CoreCivic partners with community organizations to provide learning opportunities for offenders.
• From Adult Basic Education to attainment of advanced degrees, academic programs at CoreCivic facilities follow industry and state education department best practices. Our offerings meet inmates where they are in their academic progression. This is especially important when considering that some newly incarcerated individuals may have limited formal education. Basic education is a key that can unlock the door to a better future.
• For other inmates, the challenge is different. Someone may be a high school dropout who needs a structured pathway toward a GED. Others may be high academic achievers capable of taking advantage of CoreCivic programs to pursue advanced degrees or other post-secondary study.
• For each individual, the process begins with testing and evaluation. This results in a comprehensive assessment that allows CoreCivic’s educational staff to determine the appropriate level of instruction. From there, it's a matter of taking a series of small steps toward a manageable goal.
Adult Education in Spanish
• Diversity in our culture is something that can’t be ignored in planning educational programs for those who are incarcerated. Recognizing the need to offer equally effective programs for Spanish-speaking inmates, CoreCivic offers Adult Education in Spanish at many of our correctional facilities. It's another example of CoreCivic's commitment to recognize a critical need and to go above and beyond the status quo.
• For more than 10 years, CoreCivic has partnered with the National Institute for Adult Education (Instituto Nacional de Educación para los Adultos, or INEA), an entity of the Mexican government, to provide adult education in Spanish. INEA oversees the accreditation and certification of basic educational studies in Mexico and is transferrable to some other Latin American countries. Previously referred to as the Mexican GED program, INEA supplies facilities with materials and curriculum for the primaria level (grades 1-6) and secondaria level (grades 7-9). When offenders return to their country of origin, completion of this program prepares them to secure employment more readily, while providing a launching pad for future educational achievement.
• Post-Secondary Opportunities, GRE Preparation and Testing
• In free society, the pathway to educational attainment can extend far beyond the high school level. And it's true within CoreCivic correctional facilities, too. Our classrooms service not only elementary- and secondary-level needs. They also provide opportunities at the collegiate level.
• Inmates may choose to take advantage of post-secondary programs, actually earning college credit and even a degree. Through GRE test prep, inmates may explore post-graduate opportunities, opening the door for advanced degree attainment.
• Vocational Training,
Learning a vocation leads to a new vision in life.
The ability to get and maintain employment is a key ingredient to success upon release.
That's why learning a viable trade is so vital. When offenders learn an in-demand skill, it empowers them to one day become qualified employees, or even self-employed proprietors of their own businesses.
Being able to support themselves helps keep former inmates on the path of a law-abiding life. Being employed instills a sense of purpose and self-esteem. Becoming proficient in a craft bodes well for the respect they may receive in the community.
Industry Work Programs
CoreCivic facilities put inmates to work in modern programs that are aligned closely with outside companies. Work opportunities allow inmates to earn money, learn job skills, and develop a work ethic. Participation in these programs enhances their opportunity to land an honest job after their release. Depending on the facility, the programs are either operated independently or as part of the Federal Prison Industry Enhancement Program.
Microsoft Office Specialist Program
CoreCivic is an authorized testing center for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) program, a globally recognized exam-based proficiency certification in Microsoft applications. MOS certification for Microsoft Office requires passing one or more exams. MOS certification exams provide a valid and reliable measure of technical proficiency and expertise by evaluating overall comprehension of Microsoft Office or Office Project programs, the ability to use advanced features and proficiency in integrating Office programs with other software.
Trades Training
CoreCivic's vocational programs are radically different from the previous generation’s prison work details and odd jobs. Inmates are enrolled in skill-building initiatives that offer meaningful, rewarding opportunities to gain self-esteem. Training programs are designed with an eye on realistic future jobs and careers including:
• Carpentry
• Commercial Driver’s License (CDL)
• Computer applications
• Construction and building trades
• Culinary Arts
• Electrical
• Horticulture and landscaping
• HVAC
• Masonry
• Painting
• Plumbing
• Workforce Readiness
• Veterinary Technician
CoreCivic was the first corrections agency to achieve accreditation by the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER), a nationally recognized authority in construction and maintenance training quality. As the accrediting body for the industry, NCCER establishes the benchmark for training and assessments. By partnering with industry and academia, NCCER has developed a system for program accreditation that is similar to those found in institutions of higher learning. This process fosters national unity among the construction industry while providing a defined career path with industry-recognized credentials. NCCER’s accreditation process ensures that students and craft professionals receive superior training based on uniform standards and criteria.
Life Skills Development,
It takes a certain set of skills to successfully navigate everyday life as a responsible, law abiding citizen.
These capabilities are what we in corrections call life skills.
CoreCivic's life skills and reentry programs are based on research that has uncovered proven ways to change thinking patterns, resulting in permanent changes in behavior. This is known as the cognitive-behavioral approach. Life Skills training impacts every area of an individual’s life, from coping with emotions to rearing children and from managing money to making decisions.
Cognitive-behavioral classes are designed to help inmates overcome attitude challenges and acting out in negative ways. Our approach follows a tested model of delinquency avoidance, crime prevention and cognitive rehabilitation. Participants learn about logical problem solving and the development of good decision-making skills.
Parenting and Family Dynamics
Many of the men and women in correctional facilities are fathers and mothers. Some statistics indicate that nearly three million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent. While it can be challenging to effectively and actively parent while incarcerated, CoreCivic life skills programs strive to introduce and reinforce positive parental lessons that offenders can carry with them upon release. Even while still confined, we instill strategies for inmates to build better relationships with their children as they prepare for family reunification.
CoreCivic's life skills programs focus on every stage in child development, including the role of a parent in helping children succeed in school. Also discussed are the consequences of raising a child in an “at risk” family. Teaching parenting skills and developing cognitive self-change as part of a life skills may not, in isolation, prevent criminal behavior in the inmate, but it likely will assist the child in moving in a new direction instead of following in the parent's path. Together, all of these topics may go a long way toward breaking the cycle of criminal behavior and incarceration.
Budgeting and Financial Management
Being able to smartly manage one's money is a critical skill. Learning how to spend in accordance with a budget can help former offenders withstand the pressures of resorting to illegal activity to earn money.
Poor management of family or personal finances is a major problem that is by no means limited to the incarcerated population. Few, if any, factors lead to broken families more often than financial issues. That’s why budgeting and financial management are a critical part of life skills training. Inmates who can prioritize and stay out of financial trouble are much more likely to be happier and more productive citizens after release.
Occupational Readiness
Getting prepared to enter the workforce involves more than just learning the skills of a trade or earning a certification. CoreCivic's life skills programs have a major focus on employability and occupational readiness that includes:
• Attendance
• Career exploration
• Following instructions
• Hygiene
• Job lead sources
• Proper attire
• Punctuality
• Time management
• Interpersonal Skills
Sometimes, the failure to function and prosper in society can be due to a basic lack of social or interpersonal skills. The simple truth is that many inmates, due to lack of education or lack of exposure to positive role models at home, have communication issues that hamper their success.
That's why life skills training includes a focus on interpersonal skill-building. Inmates are taught about the fundamental need for decency and respect. They learn communications skills and practice them in real-life situations. Programs also focus on independent living skills, anger control and victimization.
• Addictions Treatment and,
Dependency on alcohol and drugs can lead to devastating consequences for those caught in the destructive grip of addiction to mind-and mood-altering substances and has been overwhelmingly linked to factors that contribute to incarceration.
Indeed, national research indicates that 65% of the U.S. inmate population meets the criteria for substance use disorders, and another 20% were either under the influence of substances at the time of their offense, stole money to buy drugs, are substance abusers, or share some combination of these characteristics.
Providing inmates with evidence-based treatment is essential to eradicating the cycle of substance use, incarceration and recidivism. That's why CoreCivic is committed to offering an array of substance use disorder treatment modalities to address this critical need. CoreCivic's substance use disorder programs utilize state-of-the-art cognitive-behavorial curricula in conjunction with time-tested therapeutic community (TC) practices to help correct the program particiapants' maladaptive thinking and behavior patterns that underlie their crimes and destructive use of drugs.
Residential Drug Abuse Program
CoreCivic's residential drug-abuse program (RDAP) takes place in a separate residential unit away from the general population. The highly-structured program schedule includes group and individual counseling as well as TC activities that promote adherence to the highest standards of conduct and accountability.
Treatment begins with an initial screening and assessment process to determine the participant's suitability for treatment and identify specific treatment needs. This process is followed by the development of a customized treatment plan that will guide the participant's goals and objectives throughout the course of the program. The TC provides a safe and supportive environment in which participants can practice pro-social behaviors in accordance with TC standards of behavior.
Through intensive peer-to-peer interaction and communication, along with staff guidance and leadership, participants learn new ways of thinking and behaving that result in demonstrable and sustainable lifestyle change.
Knowledgeable, Professional Staff
CoreCivic's RDAP is administered by highly-trained, licensed or certified addictions professionals with a commitment to keeping abreast of the latest developments in addictions studies and utilizing evidence-based best practices to ensure quality program service delivery. CoreCivic's intensive and innovative company-paid learning and development strategies for addictions treatment professionals help CoreCivic recruit and retain the best and brightest in the addictions field.
Strong Associations
CoreCivic is a member of the National Association for Addiction Treatment Professionals (NAADAC), the largest national membership organization for addictions professionals, and is a NAADAC-approved education provider. Attaining this status was not an easy process. To do so, CoreCivic presented a 600-page plan outlining the company's philosophy, approach, practices and methods in addictions treatment. As a result of this rigorous examination, CoreCivic is able to provide quality continuing education opportunities that advance staff knowledge and skills in addiction-related content areas and provide continuing education units (CEUs) that are accepted by the National Certification Commission for Addictions Professionals and many of the individual state addictions licensing and certification boards.
Support Groups
Support groups are offered to offenders who recognize a need for additional help along the road to personal recovery. Available addictions treatment support group offerings can vary by facility, but may include:
• Alcoholics Anonymous
• Narcotics Anonymous
• Faith-based programs
• Partners in Parenting
• Straight Ahead (a 10-part program developed by Texas Christian University’s Institute for Behavioral Research)
• Thinking for a Change (a 22-lesson program offered by the National Institute of Corrections)
• for those who so desire,
• Faith and Religion.
• Religious and spiritual outlets can serve as a stabilizing and motivating force for many.
• Cultivating and nurturing the spirituality of inmates is a proven way to help reawaken or develop a moral and ethical foundation. Faith-based programs can extend hope and lead to changes in thinking patterns, thereby helping inmates serve their time in productive ways as they prepare to lead meaningful lives upon release.
• CoreCivic's faith-based programs are diverse, completely voluntary, and available to all inmates. CoreCivic's network of chaplains – full-time employees who oversee faith-based services at our facilities – must command a deep respect and thorough understanding of various belief systems and needs to serve those in our care.
• CoreCivic chaplains also deal with legal questions and individual counseling. The core of their work, though, is rooted in a deep understanding of dozens of religions, and many of them have degrees in theology or divinity as well as a background as a minister or chaplain in hospitals or military settings.
• CoreCivic's Inmate Programs department provides our chaplains with resources detailing the specific history, customs, religious items and belief systems of nearly 40 major religions, including various Christian denominations, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Native American tribal religions and other lesser-known faith groups.
• Many religious services are held every week and are chaplain or volunteer-led. Religious services offer inmates the opportunity to connect with and grow their faith while serving their sentences.
• Faith-based programs include a non-sectarian training and service program dedicated to changing lives through Bible and other textual study. They include seminars, programs, instruction and other methods designed to build life skills, develop positive character traits, and change thinking patterns.
• CoreCivic offers Residential Community Programs that are faith-based, completely voluntary, and non-sectarian. These Residential Programs offer healthy character development in an environment that promotes pro-social attitudes and life skills.
• Faith-Based Partnerships
• The logistics and expense of putting faith-based programs into CoreCivic facilities throughout the nation are considerable. That’s where a number of partnerships come in. Several leading national and international ministries assist in the direction and administration of the programs, helping to refine and improve them each and every day. These include Champions for Life, Child Evangelism Fellowship, Habitat for Humanity, Prison Fellowship Saddleback Ministries, School of Christ International, Trinity Broadcasting Network and Wheels for the World, to name a few.
• Local Volunteer Support
• Few of CoreCivic's faith-based initiatives would be possible without the volunteer assistance provided by local churches, ministries and faith groups. Countless hours are devoted by those volunteer organizations who seek to share life-changing spirituality to CoreCivic's prison population.

Ultimately, our goal is to curb the cycle of recidivism. Supporting those who've been given a second chance to change their lives for the better helps make that impact.

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Inmate Locator

Boston Avenue - CoreCivic publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in California. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

Visitation Information

Visiting hours for Boston Avenue - CoreCivic. For Directions call 619-232-1066

Sunday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Monday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Tuesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Thursday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Federal Holidays 8:00 am - 3:00 pm

No cellphones, you will be searched before visiting. NO personal belongings. Persons under probation, parole, or other community corrections supervision must obtain the permission of both their individual supervising officer and the superintendent prior to a visit. Such visitation is not normally approved.

If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is a family member of the inmate, they must be accompanied by an adult family member or guardian to include a member of the inmate's extended family. If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is not a family member of the inmate, the minor visitor must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

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Facility Type

Reentry & Treatment Facilities partner with state and local governments to provide community-based adult residential reentry services to offenders released or diverted from prison. These facilities are designed to provide structured programming with a focus on substance abuse treatment and education and changing criminal behaviors. Additional services offered at residential reentry facilities include comprehensive assessment, individual and group counseling, life-skills training, and aftercare. Ultimately, each program helps prepare residents to successfully reintegrate into their communities. Each RRM supervises a group of regional housing locations, their addresses and phone numbers are listed in Extra Information below.

In the federal system, the reentry philosophy begins with the first day of incarceration, having the inmate focus on their release preparation with 18 months remaining on their sentence. The Release Preparation Program includes classes in areas such as writing a resume, finding a job, and keeping that job. The program also includes presentations by community-based organizations that help ex-inmates find jobs and training opportunities after release. The BOP designates inmates to Residential Reentry Centers prior to their full release to help them adjust to life in the local community and help seek employment. Some inmates will be eligible for a release gratuity, clothing, or money for transportation to their release destination.

The Inmate Transition Branch provides additional pre-release employment assistance. Many institutions hold mock job fairs to provide inmates an opportunity to practice job interview skills and to expose community recruiters to the skills available among releasing inmates. Qualified inmates may apply for jobs with companies that have posted job openings. This Branch also helps inmates prepare release folders that include a resume; certificates of completion of programs in education or other vocational training certificates, earned diplomas, and other requisite documents needed for job searches and subsequent interviews.

Custody/Security Level

Boston Avenue - CoreCivic located at 2727 Boston Ave, San Diego, CA and is a minimum security facility, which the lowest custody level for a prison. Inmates must short-timers and non-violent with a clear disciplinary history to qualify for camp designation because they are not considered dangerous or an escape risk. Violence is also considered a minimum as there is an incentive to remain in the camp versus being shipped to a higher custody level for misbehaving.

The camp is considered the best situation to be in if you have to be incarcerated. Minimum security prisons or prison camps are comprised of non-secure dormitories which are overseen by a single correctional officer. The camp has areas for laundry/kitchen area, toilet and shower area, sleeping quarters that contain double bunks and lockers.

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How To Send Things

There are strict procedures for everything related to "sending things to an inmate" in a Minimum - general facility. This includes sending money for commissary packages, sending mail like letters with photos, magazine subscriptions, buying phone time, postcards and greeting cards, and even distance learning courses (get your degree, you've got a lot of extra time). You also need to know about visitation, what are the hours and rules.

All of the information you could ever need to know is below, patiently scroll the page and get as much information about Boston Avenue - CoreCivic that you'd ever want to know. If there is anything that you were looking for, but don't see, please email us at aid@inmateaid.com.

How To Send Money:

How to Send an Inmate Money in California

Here are some general guidelines for sending money to an inmate's trust account; but not specific to a particular facility, institution or jail. Inmates need money to access several privileges like weekly shopping at the commissary, making phone calls, using the email service where offered, using the electronic tablets where offered and paying their co-pay when needing the medical or dental services. Some county jails require a per-night fee for the jail’s expenses.

What is a Commissary?

A commissary is a store within the jail. Commissary day is usually held once a week and can only be used if the inmate has funds in their commissary account, like a bank account within the institution. If the inmate has a job, their paycheck is deposited into this account, too.

The Commissary sells various products that the inmates may purchase if they have money on their books. Items sold are clothing, shoes, snacks and food, as well as hygienic products like soap, shampoo, and shavers. The commissary also sells products like books, magazines, televisions, radios, playing cards, headphones, MP3 players, electronic tablets, songs and educational programming. They also sell paper, envelopes, and stamps allowing the inmate to write their loved ones, friends and family. Facilities will provide stamps and paper to inmates who are indigent – eligible where no money has been in their commissary account for at least 30 days.

How you send money to an inmate?

Sending money to an inmate varies from state to state, depending if it is county, state or federal, their ways of accepting money for inmates’ changes by the money transfer company they’ve contracted with. Federal Prisons and some state-level prisons have centralized banking systems which means that you do not need to know where they are specifically, just that they are in the state systems of for instance the California, Texas, Florida DOC or the FBOP to name a few.

How do I send money using MoneyGram?

Some facilities will allow you to deposit cash through the lobby window stand-alone kiosk in the lobby or visitation room. Most facilities will also accept a postal money order mailed to the institution’s inmate mailing address made payable to the full inmate’s name.

Electronic banking allows friends and family members to send the funds online, and correctional departments are starting to favor this method because it is less work for staff and more accurate/easier to keep track of, as well as being more convenient.

Regardless of the method of sending funds, there are several key things you will need to know:
• Inmate’s full committed name
• Inmate’s ID number
• Inmate’s location – or a system like the federal BOP

Before sending any funds you should find out what online transfer companies the institution your inmate is incarcerated in uses. You can find this information on our site by navigating to the facilities page click on the Money Transfer button under the address and phone number.

Pay close attention to the rules of the facility. Sometimes they will require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time, but in federal, there is no limit.

MoneyGram, JPay, OffenderConnect, AccessCorrections, JailATM, WU, Touchpayonline, tigercommissary, smartdeposit are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities. MoneyGram is by far the oldest and most trusted.

Who else can access the money you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution will be subject to commissary/trust account garnishment. If the inmate has these financial obligations, they will be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It may be a percentage or the entire amount depending on the situation. We recommend inmates who are going into their bid contact the counselor and make an arrangement beforehand. If you go in knowing they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is better than have them take it all and you find out in the commissary line when the account is zero.

Why is my inmate asking for more than I normally send?

This is generally a signal that the inmate is doing something they shouldn’t and need money to get them out of or through a situation. It could be gambling, it could be extortion it could be other things you don’t need to know on this forum (for now). Set boundaries with your inmate. Tell them that “this is the amount I can send each month” and that is it. There are no extras beyond the boundary. Also, NEVER send money to the account of another inmate on your inmate’s instruction. This is a sign that something is not right. If the corrections people discover this, and they do more times than not, it will result in some severe disciplinary action to the inmate, and certainly the loss of all privileges.

Who can I call if I suspect something?

We recommend speaking with the counselor or case manager of the facility and use a generic reference in the event that your suspicions are wrong. You needn’t put them in a more difficult position if they are.

Inmate Care Packages:

How to Buy Inmate Commissary Care Packages Online

Show your loved one how much you care – order a package today! The facilities usually have a weekly limit of about $100 per inmate, plus processing and tax. The orders do NOT count towards the inmates weekly commissary allowances Deposits can be made online for inmates 24/7 using a credit/debit card

There are also a few services that allow you how to order inmate commissary online. These trusted providers are approved and share revenue with the prisons from the sales to the inmates.

Here is a list of other similar programs prison commissary: Keefe Group, Access Securpak, iCareGifts, Union Supply Direct, Walkenhorst's, CareACell

Inmate Commissary:

What is Inmate Commissary?

Prison commissary (also sometimes referred to as inmate canteen) is a store for inmates housed within a correctional facility. While the very most basics may be provided for by a given correctional department, there are also other important goods/services that Florida prisoners and inmates must buy. For instance, supplies such as supplementary food, female hygiene products, books, writing utensils and a plethora of other things are examples of things that can be purchased as part of an inmate commissary packages for goods.

What is an Inmate trust account?

When you add money to an inmate account, the prison funds are stored on an inmate trust fund. This prison account basically acts as a personal bank account of an inmate. They will use this account to make Inmate Calls, pay for postage to Send Photos from Inmates, send emails from inmates, purchase Items from Commissary, receive wages from jobs, and more.

How To Send Mail:

This is how to send your inmate at Boston Avenue - CoreCivic letters, photos, postcards, greeting cards and magazines

Incoming and outgoing inmate mail is subject to inspection for the presence of contraband that might threaten the safety, security or well-being of the jail/facility, its staff, and residents. Inmates may receive only metered, unstamped, plain white postcards no larger than 4" x 6" as mail. Writing must be in pencil or blue or black ink. Any other mail will be returned to the sender. If no return address is available, unauthorized mail will be stored in the inmate's locker until the inmate's release.

Inmate mail cannot contain any of the following: Create an immediate threat to jail order by describing the manufacture of weapons, bombs, incendiary devices, or tools for escape that realistically are a danger to jail security; Advocate violence, racial supremacy or ethnic purity; No current inmate-to-inmate mail will be allowed and will be destroyed.

The easiest workaround is to look over the mailing services of InmateAid. We have an automated system for sending your loved one that special message or picture. We send thousands of pieces of mail per month with NO issues with the prisons or jails. The envelopes display the InmateAid logo, the mail room knows for certain that the contents will not be compromising. This trust was established in 2012.

How To Send Greeting Cards and Postcards:

Greeting cards are great for the holidays and birthdays. The ones from the store often have more than just the message because the policies surrounding appropriate content (no nudity or sexually suggestive material no matter how funny), and they cannot have glitter, stickers or anything else that makes the card different from a normal plain old card. Instead of going to the Hallmark store in the mall and looking around for hours - go to our easy to search Greeting Cards service.

It takes literally 45 seconds and it's very affordable for what you're getting (and what they are getting, too!). Select from 100s of birthday, anniversary and every holiday you can think of, and VERY easy to send from your phone on InmateAid:

Don't forget Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, New Year's, Ramadan, Hanukkah, Passover, Easter, Kwanzaa or Valentine's Day!

In less than a minute and only $0.99, this act of kindness will be worth a million to your inmate. If you have a picture or two and don't want to write a long letter. Type out a little love in the message box and send your latest selfie... only 99 cents!

Don't wait until the moment has passed, it's easy and convenient to let them know you're thinking of them at every moment.

How To Send magazines and Books:

Send magazines to Boston Avenue - CoreCivic at 2727 Boston Ave, San Diego, CA

Send the best magazines and books to your Inmate in jail or prison, it's the gift that keeps on giving all year round, There is nothing more exciting to an inmate (besides their release date) than getting their favorite magazine every month at mail call.

Magazines and books must come directly from the publisher. You are not allowed to send single magazines in an envelope. They need to come directly from the publisher with your inmate's name affixed to the address label. Magazine subscriptions are easy to set up, it takes literally 2 minutes.

You know when you go into the grocery and browse the new magazines on display? You see hundreds. Inside they place a little card that if you fill it out and send it in with your inmate's name, ID number and facility address - you drop it in the mail and in 8-12 weeks your inmate gets an issue every month for a whole year. Thankfully, there is an easier way, just CLICK here and browse yourself. Select a title or two and add your inmate's name to the order. It's fast, it's reliable and it's at a discounted rate for your convenience.

How To Save Money on Inmate Calls

The prison phone companies have a monopoly at the facility they have a contract with. Profits are shared so there is no incentive for their representatives to show you how to save money. They post their rates and in almost every case, there are at least two pricing tiers. Depending on where you are and where your inmate is, the type of phone number you use will make all the difference.

In federal prison, the answer is simply that a new local number will change your inmate's call rate from $.21 per minute to only $.06 per minute. Fed gives you only 300 minutes per month, the local line service is only $8.95, no hidden fees or bundling of other unwanted service charges

For the other facilities that are not federal, it used to be that a local number was the answer. Now, its market intelligence and InmateAid has made it their business to know what the best deal is in every scenario. And we can tell you that in 30% of the cases, we cannot save you a penny - and neither can anyone else. But we will give you a refund if we can't save you money.

For more specific information on inmate calls, you will want to navigate to the facility your inmate is incarcerated in through our site by going to Prison Directory and following the links to the Discount Telephone Service - get an honest estimate before you buy.

Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

Great Deals For You and Your Inmate