Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low

Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP)

Last Updated: April 18, 2019
Address
1341 Hwy 95 N, Bastrop, TX 78602
Beds
1156
County
Bastrop
Security Level
federal low
Phone
512-321-3903
Fax
512-304-0117
Email
bas/execassistant@bop.gov
Mailing Address
PO Box 1010, Bastrop, TX 78602
Facility Type
Adult
Money Transfer
Satellite View of Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low

Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low's comprehensive information to help guide you through the federal prison process, specifically on how to remain connected to your inmate while they are incarcerated.

The FCI-Bastrop Low is a federal prison located at 1341 Hwy 95 N in Bastrop, TX. This federal low security prison is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) to hold inmates who have been convicted to and sentenced for a federal crime through the US Department of Justice (DOJ).

Locate all federal inmates here. If you would like to speak with a case manager or counselor, call 512-321-3903.

Upon sentencing in Federal District Court, the BOP has the sole responsibility in determining where an offender will be designated for service of their sentence (not the judge or prosecutor). The BOP's Designation and Sentence Computation Center (DSCC), located at the Grand Prairie, TX determines where the inmates will be placed.

Inmate Security and Custody Classification manual.

Prior to a designation occurring, the DSCC must receive for consideration all sentencing material regarding the offender. These documents are received from the sentencing Court, US Probation Office, and the US Marshals Service and processed. The BOP tries to designate inmates to facilities that fit with their custody level and program needs within a 500-mile radius of their release residence. If an inmate is placed at an institution that is more than 500 miles from his/her release residence, generally, it is due to a specific security, programming, or population concerns. The same criteria apply when making decisions for transfer to a new facility.

Inmates are designated/re-designated to institutions based on:

  • the level of security and staff supervision the inmate requires,
  • the level of security and staff supervision the institution provides,
  • the medical classification care level of the inmate and the care level of the institution,
  • the inmate's program needs (e.g., substance abuse treatment, educational/vocational training, individual and/or group counseling, medical/mental health treatment), and
  • various administrative factors (e.g., institution bed space capacity; the inmate's release residence; judicial recommendations; separation needs; and security measures needed to ensure the protection of victims, witnesses, and the general public).

After Arriving

Each inmate is interviewed and screened by staff from the case management, medical, and mental health units. Later, an inmate is assigned to the Admission and Orientation (A&O) Program, where he or she receives a formal orientation to the programs, services, policies, and procedures of that facility. This program provides an introduction to all aspects of the institution.

Personal Property

For security, safety, and sanitation reasons, the Bureau limits the amount of property (jewelry, photographs, books, magazines, etc.) inmates may have and the types of publications inmates can receive. The institution issues clothing, hygiene items, and bedding; and provides laundry services. Inmates may purchase other personal care items, shoes, some recreational clothing, and some food items through the commissary. Civilian clothing (i.e., clothing not issued to the inmate by the Bureau or purchased by the inmate from the commissary) ordinarily must be sent home.

In most cases, inmates who do not have a high school diploma or a General Educational Development (GED) certificate must participate in the literacy program for a minimum of 240 hours or until they obtain the GED. Non-English-speaking inmates must take English as a Second Language.

Vocational and occupational training programs are based on the needs of the inmates, general labor market conditions, and institution labor force needs. An important component is on-the-job training, which inmates receive through institution job assignments and work in Federal Prison Industries. The Bureau also facilitates post-secondary education in vocational and occupationally oriented areas. Some traditional college courses are available, but inmates are responsible for funding this coursework.

The BOP provides progressive and humane treatment and services to federal inmates and implements programs that facilitate their successful reintegration into society.

Each BOP facility offers programs and services that vary based on the characteristics and needs of its specific inmate population.

The Federal Correctional Institution, Bastrop (FCI Bastrop) is a low-security United States federal prison for male inmates in Texas. It is operated by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The facility also has an adjacent satellite prison camp that houses minimum-security offenders.

FCI Bastrop is located 8 miles north of the city of Bastrop and 30 miles southeast of Austin.

Background: FCI Bastrop was opened in 1979. Notable inmates include Leandro Luna and Adan Chavez, (both with narcotics convictions), escaped the prison in 2009 in a stolen Federal Bureau of Prisons vehicle on route to Mexico. They were tracked by the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force, consisting of local authorities, Texas Rangers, and U.S. Marshals. The public wasn’t notified for two days of their escape, and the prison did not share any further details. Both men were apprehended by Mexican authorities six days after the escape.

Notable inmates include former NFL receiver Sam Hurd who pleaded guilty in 2013 to conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute a controlled substance in connection with his attempt to form a cocaine and marijuana ring in Chicago, IL. Richard Causey the former chief accountant of the now-defunct Enron Corporation who pleaded guilty to securities fraud for misleading shareholders about Enron's financial problems, he served four years. Chris Lamprecht a computer hacker; known as the first person to be legally barred from using the Internet; pleaded guilty to money laundering in 1995 for stealing and selling telecommunications equipment.

Housing: Inmates at FCI Bastrop are housed in two-man cells within one of five dormitories.

Health Services: Health services include sick call, dental call, physical examinations, emergency medical and dental care, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic infectious diseases, and prescription medications (over-the-counter medications are available in the commissary). Inmates must submit a sick call form to be evaluated for non-emergency medical needs, for a $2.00 fee charged to the Inmate Commissary Account, per health care visit. Emergency medical care is available 24 hours a day at no fee.

Psychology Services: Inmates at FCI Bastrop have access to a psychologist who provides counseling and other mental health services. Each psychologist has an office inside the institution, and at the camp, where they can be easily reached by inmates to help develop ongoing counseling programs or for personal crisis intervention. Individual and group therapy are available along with a variety of substance abuse programs. Specialty groups for addictions, self-image groups, and other voluntary groups are also available. A contract psychiatrist is also available by referral from the psychologist.

Residential Drug Abuse Program (RDAP): FCI Bastrop houses a Residential Drug Abuse Program (RDAP). The facilities also provide drug abuse programs, a Drug Abuse Education Course, Non-Residential Drug Abuse Program (NR-DAP), and Alcoholics Anonymous (AA).

Education Services: FCI Bastrop provides literacy, GED, English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) programs, Adult Continuing Education (ACE), and special learning needs courses. A parenting program is also available. High school diplomas and post-secondary programs are available through paid correspondence programs.

Advanced Occupational Education: FCI Bastrop offers advanced occupational training in Building Trades, Culinary Arts, Horticulture, and Oil and Gas Field Technician. The camp does not offer any advanced occupational education.

Apprenticeship: FCI Bastrop offers apprenticeships in Baking, Carpentry, Cooking, Dental Assistant, Electrician, Electrician Maintenance, Heating and A/C Installer and Servicer, Maintenance Repairer, Painting, Plumbing, and Quality Control Technicians.

Library Services: The leisure library and the law library are located in the Education Department. Inmate clerks are available to assist in research and preparation. All required legal materials are available for viewing in the law library. A copying machine is available to reproduce materials needed for research. The leisure library contains books, magazines, and newspapers for use during leisure time. The TRULINCS Electronic Law Library is also available to the inmate population in the Education Department.

UNICOR: The FCI Bastrop UNICOR factory retrofits vehicles for other government agencies.

Commissary: Inmates may use funds in their account to purchase items at the institution commissary, place funds on their inmate phone account, purchase TRU-Units for their TRULINCS account, or otherwise send funds. Inmates are permitted to spend up to $180.00 biweekly for commissary purchases and Special Purchase Orders (SPOs). Remaining money at the end of the period cannot be carried over into the next period. Withdrawals for education and leisure time items are approved by the Supervisor of Education up to $320.00.

Recreation Services: The FCI Bastrop Recreation Department consists of both indoor and outdoor activities. Facilities include a gym, hobby craft shop, weight area, and recreation yard. The satellite camp offers a fitness area and hobby craft shop.

Admissions and Orientation (A&O) Handbook - This document provides you with general information about the institution, programs, rules, and regulations that you will encounter during your confinement. Familiarizing yourself with this information and knowing your responsibilities will help you to adjustment to institution life.

Commissary List - In 1930 the Department of Justice authorized and established a Commissary at each Federal institution. The Commissary provides a bank type account for your money & for the procurement of articles not issued regularly as part of the institution administration. Funds deposited by your family, friends, or other sources are stored in your commissary account that we maintain.

Legal Activities - This document outlines the procedures for access to legal reference materials and legal counsel and the opportunities that you will be afforded to prepare legal documents while incarcerated.

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Inmate Locator

Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low is a facility in the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) publishes the names of their inmates currently in one of their locations nationwide. Your search should start with the first locator to see if your loved one is there. You will need the offender's first and last name and it must be spelled exactly. If you have a nine-digit BOP Inmate ID number (xxxxx-xxx)

If you cannot find your inmate in the federal search, the second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is all the inmates currently incarcerated in all prisons, jails and detention centers. You do not need to sign up to use this free inmate locator.

Visitation Information

Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low - Visiting Hours

  • Friday 8:00am – 3:00pm
  • Saturday 8:00am – 3:00pm
  • Sunday 8:00am – 3:00pm
  • Holidays 8:00am – 3:00pm

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Facility Type

This Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low is a secure facility overseen by the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). The BOP is a division of the US Justice Department whose main function is to protect public safety by ensuring that federal offenders serve their sentences of imprisonment in facilities that are safe, humane, cost-efficient, and appropriately secure, and provide reentry programming to ensure their successful return to the community.

The prisons or institutions located throughout the US are operated at five different security levels in order to confine offenders in an appropriate manner. Security levels are based on such features as the presence of external patrols, towers, security barriers, or detection devices; the type of housing within the institution; internal security features; and the staff-to-inmate ratio.

Facilities are designated as either minimum, low, medium, high, or administrative; and facilities with different security levels that are in close proximity to each other are known as prison complexes.

Inmates are designated/re-designated to institutions based on several factors

  • the level of security and staff supervision the inmate requires
  • the level of security and staff supervision the institution provides
  • the medical classification care level of the inmate and the care level of the institution
  • the inmate's program needs (e.g., substance abuse treatment, educational/vocational training, individual and/or group counseling, medical/mental health treatment), and various factors (i.e institution bed space capacity; the inmate's release residence; judicial recommendations; separation needs; and security measures needed to ensure the protection of victims, witnesses, and the general public).

After arriving each inmate is interviewed and screened by staff from the case management, medical, and mental health units. Later, an inmate is assigned to the Admission and Orientation (A & O) Program, where he or she receives a formal orientation to the programs, services, policies, and procedures of that facility. This program provides an introduction to all aspects of the institution.

Personal Property

For security, safety, and sanitation reasons, the Bureau limits the amount of property (jewelry, photographs, books, magazines, etc.) inmates may have and the types of publications inmates can receive. The institution issues clothing, hygiene items, and bedding; and provides laundry services. Inmates may purchase other personal care items, shoes, some recreational clothing, and some food items through the commissary. Civilian clothing (i.e., clothing not issued to the inmate by the Bureau or purchased by the inmate from the commissary) ordinarily is not authorized for retention by the inmate.

Inmates may only possess those items they are authorized to retain upon admission to the institution, items issued by authorized staff, items purchased by the inmate from the commissary, or items purchased or received through approved channels (to include that approved for receipt by an authorized staff member or authorized by institution guidelines). All other items are considered contraband and will be seized and disposed of (destroyed, mailed out of the institution at the inmate's expense, etc.) in accordance with Bureau regulations. Contraband that threatens the security of the institution may result in disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution for the inmate.

Custody/Security Level

Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low located at 1341 Hwy 95 N in Bastrop, TX and is classified as low-security federal prison within the BOP. Federal Correctional Institutions (FCIs), house approximately 35% of the federal prison population. They generally have some multi-cell units and dormitory-style housing that have double-fenced razor wire perimeters with electronic detection systems.

Movement within the compound is strictly controlled but may be open after the 4 p.m. count. Low-security federal prisons have higher inmate-to-staff ratios compared to minimum-security prison camps, and monitoring of mail, email, telephone calls, and visits is more rigid.

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How To Send Things

There are strict procedures for everything related to "sending things to an inmate" in a federal low facility. This includes sending money for commissary packages, sending mail like letters with photos, magazine subscriptions, buying phone time, postcards and greeting cards, and even distance learning courses (get your degree, you've got a lot of extra time). You also need to know about visitation, what are the hours and rules.

All of the information you could ever need to know is below, patiently scroll the page and get as much information about Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low that you'd ever want to know. If there is anything that you were looking for, but don't see, please email us at aid@inmateaid.com.

How To Send Money:

How to Send an Inmate Money in Texas

These are general guidelines for sending money to an inmate's Trulincs account. Inmates need money to access several privileges like weekly commissary visits, outbound phone calls, using Corrlinks email, electronic tablets where offered and paying their co-pay when needing the medical or dental services.

What is a Commissary?

A commissary is a store within the correctional institution. Commissary day is usually held once a week and can only be enjoyed if the inmate has funds in their commissary account. An inmate's commissary account is like a bank account within the institution. If the inmate has a job, their paycheck is deposited into this account, too.

The Commissary sells various products that the inmates may purchase if they have money on their books. The commissary sells clothing, shoes, snacks and food, as well as hygienic products like soap, shampoo, and shavers. The commissary might also sell entertainment-related products like books, magazines, televisions, radios, playing cards, headphones, MP3 players, electronic tablets like an iPad (no internet access), songs and educational programming.

The commissary also sells is paper, envelopes, and stamps which allows the inmate to write their loved ones, friends and family. Most facilities will provide stamps and paper to inmates who are indigent – that means that there can be no money in their commissary account for at least 30 days to become eligible.

How you send money to an inmate?

Sending money to an inmate varies from state to state, depending if it is county, state or federal, their ways of accepting money for inmates’ changes by the money transfer company they’ve contracted with.

Federal Prisons and some state-level prisons have centralized banking systems which means that you do not need to know where they are specifically, just that they are in the state systems of for instance the California, Texas, Florida DOC or the FBOP to name a few.

Some facilities will allow you to deposit cash through the lobby window stand-alone kiosk in the lobby or visitation room. Most facilities will also accept a postal money order mailed to the institution’s inmate mailing address made payable to the full inmate’s name.

Electronic banking allows friends and family members to send the funds online, and correctional departments are starting to favor this method because it is less work for staff and more accurate/easier to keep track of, as well as being more convenient.

Regardless of the method of sending funds, there are several key things you will need to know:
• Inmate’s full committed name
• Inmate’s ID number
• Inmate’s location – or a system like the federal BOP

Before sending any funds you should find out what online transfer companies the institution your inmate is incarcerated in uses. You can find this information on our site by navigating to the facilities page click on the Money Transfer button under the address and phone number.

Pay close attention to the rules of the facility. Sometimes they will require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time, but in federal, there is no limit.

Use MoneyGram to get the funds there instantly. How do I send money using MoneyGram?

Sending funds using MoneyGram to a BOP facility
Inmates can receive funds at a BOP-managed facility, which are deposited into their commissary accounts. You can send inmate funds electronically using MoneyGram's ExpressPayment Program.
1. Funds are received and processed seven days per week, including holidays.
2. Funds sent between 7:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. EST are posted within 2-4 hours.
3. Funds sent after 9:00 p.m. EST is posted at 7:00 a.m. EST the following morning.

To send funds to your federal inmate, please read and follow these steps carefully:
1. Wait until your inmate has physically arrived at an FBOP facility.
2. You'll need the following information:

  • Account Number: Inmate's eight-digit register number with no spaces or dashes, followed immediately by the inmate's last name (example: 12345678DOE).
  • Company Name: Federal Bureau of Prisons
  • City & State: Washington, DC
  • Receive Code is always: 7932 and the amount you are sending (up to $300).
  • Beneficiary: Inmate's full committed name

3. CLICK to send the funds through MoneyGram over the internet
4. First-time users will have to set up a profile and account.
5. A MasterCard or Visa credit/debit card is required.

Who else can access the money you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution will be subject to commissary/trust account garnishment. If the inmate has these financial obligations, they will be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It may be a percentage or the entire amount depending on the situation. We recommend inmates who are going into their bid contact the counselor and make an arrangement beforehand. If you go in knowing they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is better than have them take it all and you find out in the commissary line when the account is zero.

Why is my inmate asking for more than I normally send?

This is generally a signal that the inmate is doing something they shouldn’t and need money to get them out of or through a situation. It could be gambling, it could be extortion it could be other things you don’t need to know on this forum (for now). Set boundaries with your inmate. Tell them that “this is the amount I can send each month” and that is it. There are no extras beyond the boundary.

Also, NEVER send money to the account of another inmate on your inmate’s instruction. This is a sign that something is not right. If the corrections people discover this, and they do more times than not, it will result in some severe disciplinary action to the inmate, and certainly the loss of all privileges.

Who can I call if I suspect something?

We recommend speaking with the counselor or case manager of the facility and use a generic reference in the event that your suspicions are wrong. You needn’t put them in a more difficult position if they are.

Inmate Care Packages:

How to Buy Inmate Commissary Care Packages Online

Show your loved one how much you care – order a package today! The facilities usually have a weekly limit of about $100 per inmate, plus processing and tax. The orders do NOT count towards the inmates weekly commissary allowances Deposits can be made online for inmates 24/7 using a credit/debit card

There are also a few services that allow you how to order inmate commissary online. These trusted providers are approved and share revenue with the prisons from the sales to the inmates.

Here is a list of other similar programs prison commissary: Keefe Group, Access Securpak, iCareGifts, Union Supply Direct, Walkenhorst's, CareACell

Inmate Commissary:

What is Inmate Commissary?

Prison commissary (also sometimes referred to as inmate canteen) is a store for inmates housed within a correctional facility. While the very most basics may be provided for by a given correctional department, there are also other important goods/services that Florida prisoners and inmates must buy. For instance, supplies such as supplementary food, female hygiene products, books, writing utensils and a plethora of other things are examples of things that can be purchased as part of an inmate commissary packages for goods.

What is an Inmate trust account?

When you add money to an inmate account, the prison funds are stored on an inmate trust fund. This prison account basically acts as a personal bank account of an inmate. They will use this account to make Inmate Calls, pay for postage to Send Photos from Inmates, send emails from inmates, purchase Items from Commissary, receive wages from jobs, and more.

How To Send Mail:

This is how to send your inmate at Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low letters, photos, postcards, greeting cards and magazines

Incoming and outgoing inmate mail is subject to inspection for the presence of contraband that might threaten the safety, security or well-being of the jail/facility, its staff, and residents. Inmates may receive only metered, unstamped, plain white postcards no larger than 4" x 6" as mail. Writing must be in pencil or blue or black ink. Any other mail will be returned to the sender. If no return address is available, unauthorized mail will be stored in the inmate's locker until the inmate's release.

Inmate mail cannot contain any of the following: Create an immediate threat to jail order by describing the manufacture of weapons, bombs, incendiary devices, or tools for escape that realistically are a danger to jail security; Advocate violence, racial supremacy or ethnic purity; No current inmate-to-inmate mail will be allowed and will be destroyed.

The easiest workaround is to look over the mailing services of InmateAid. We have an automated system for sending your loved one that special message or picture. We send thousands of pieces of mail per month with NO issues with the prisons or jails. The envelopes display the InmateAid logo, the mail room knows for certain that the contents will not be compromising. This trust was established in 2012.

How To Send Greeting Cards and Postcards:

Greeting cards are great for the holidays and birthdays. The ones from the store often have more than just the message because the policies surrounding appropriate content (no nudity or sexually suggestive material no matter how funny), and they cannot have glitter, stickers or anything else that makes the card different from a normal plain old card. Instead of going to the Hallmark store in the mall and looking around for hours - go to our easy to search Greeting Cards service.

It takes literally 45 seconds and it's very affordable for what you're getting (and what they are getting, too!). Select from 100s of birthday, anniversary and every holiday you can think of, and VERY easy to send from your phone on InmateAid:

Don't forget Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, New Year's, Ramadan, Hanukkah, Passover, Easter, Kwanzaa or Valentine's Day!

In less than a minute and only $0.99, this act of kindness will be worth a million to your inmate. If you have a picture or two and don't want to write a long letter. Type out a little love in the message box and send your latest selfie... only 99 cents!

Don't wait until the moment has passed, it's easy and convenient to let them know you're thinking of them at every moment.

How To Send magazines and Books:

Send magazines to Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) - Bastrop Low at 1341 Hwy 95 N, Bastrop, TX

Send the best magazines and books to your Inmate in jail or prison, it's the gift that keeps on giving all year round, There is nothing more exciting to an inmate (besides their release date) than getting their favorite magazine every month at mail call.

Magazines and books must come directly from the publisher. You are not allowed to send single magazines in an envelope. They need to come directly from the publisher with your inmate's name affixed to the address label. Magazine subscriptions are easy to set up, it takes literally 2 minutes.

You know when you go into the grocery and browse the new magazines on display? You see hundreds. Inside they place a little card that if you fill it out and send it in with your inmate's name, ID number and facility address - you drop it in the mail and in 8-12 weeks your inmate gets an issue every month for a whole year. Thankfully, there is an easier way, just CLICK here and browse yourself. Select a title or two and add your inmate's name to the order. It's fast, it's reliable and it's at a discounted rate for your convenience.

How To Save Money on Inmate Calls

The prison phone companies have a monopoly at the facility they have a contract with. Profits are shared so there is no incentive for their representatives to show you how to save money. They post their rates and in almost every case, there are at least two pricing tiers. Depending on where you are and where your inmate is, the type of phone number you use will make all the difference.

In federal prison, the answer is simply that a new local number will change your inmate's call rate from $.21 per minute to only $.06 per minute. Fed gives you only 300 minutes per month, the local line service is only $8.95, no hidden fees or bundling of other unwanted service charges

For the other facilities that are not federal, it used to be that a local number was the answer. Now, its market intelligence and InmateAid has made it their business to know what the best deal is in every scenario. And we can tell you that in 30% of the cases, we cannot save you a penny - and neither can anyone else. But we will give you a refund if we can't save you money.

For more specific information on inmate calls, you will want to navigate to the facility your inmate is incarcerated in through our site by going to Prison Directory and following the links to the Discount Telephone Service - get an honest estimate before you buy.

Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

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