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Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic

Private Facility

Last Updated: May 19, 2020
Address
1450 E 62nd Ave, Denver, CO 80216
County
Denver
Phone
720-377-0900
Fax
720-377-0901

Adams Transitional is for Private Facility offenders sentenced to at least twelve months.

All prisons and jails have Security or Custody levels depending on the inmate’s classification, sentence, and criminal history. Please review the rules and regulations for Reentry facility.

If you are unsure of your inmate's location, you can search and locate your inmate by typing in their last name, first name or first initial, and/or the offender ID number to get their accurate information immediately Registered Offenders

Satellite View of Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic

Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 720-377-0900

The inmates housed at Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic located at 1450 E 62nd Ave in Denver, CO are placed according to their custody level and are incarcerated by a private company contracted by a government agency and are paid a per diem or monthly rate, either for each inmate in the facility or for each bed available. The facility is well-trained and well-staffed. This doesn't come without some controversy as the "price of incarceration" is big business and critics claim there is a monetary benefit to keeping people locked up. The flip side is this facility undergoes rigorous inspections and are some of the be maintained in the US.

For inmates that show a willingness to learn new things, there are educational and vocational training programs here that will prepare them for a successful reentry when released.

Adams Transitional Center is a privately-managed Community Corrections Center by public company CoreCivic. The facility focuses on Inmate Reentry Preparation

Inmate Programs
• Academic Education,
• Learning can be the passport to changing a person's life. In general, this is true for everyone, but for those who have been incarcerated, it can hold the key to personal transformation.
• It's been proven that people who participate in educational programs while in prison are much less likely to be re-arrested and find themselves incarcerated again. Earning an educational credential for inmates is about much more than a piece of paper. It represents the promise of a new, law-abiding life, one in which they can be gainfully employed, support their families and earn the respect of their communities.
Adult Basic Education
• The ability to read and write is essential. Reading is required to understand the world around us, and writing is a basic skill that helps us share information and ideas. For far too many inmates, the educational process hinges on its most basic step - the ability to read and write. In addition to our own educators, CoreCivic partners with community organizations to provide learning opportunities for offenders.
• From Adult Basic Education to attainment of advanced degrees, academic programs at CoreCivic facilities follow industry and state education department best practices. Our offerings meet inmates where they are in their academic progression. This is especially important when considering that some newly incarcerated individuals may have limited formal education. Basic education is a key that can unlock the door to a better future.
• For other inmates, the challenge is different. Someone may be a high school dropout who needs a structured pathway toward a GED. Others may be high academic achievers capable of taking advantage of CoreCivic programs to pursue advanced degrees or other post-secondary study.
• For each individual, the process begins with testing and evaluation. This results in a comprehensive assessment that allows CoreCivic’s educational staff to determine the appropriate level of instruction. From there, it's a matter of taking a series of small steps toward a manageable goal.
Adult Education in Spanish
• Diversity in our culture is something that can’t be ignored in planning educational programs for those who are incarcerated. Recognizing the need to offer equally effective programs for Spanish-speaking inmates, CoreCivic offers Adult Education in Spanish at many of our correctional facilities. It's another example of CoreCivic's commitment to recognize a critical need and to go above and beyond the status quo.
• For more than 10 years, CoreCivic has partnered with the National Institute for Adult Education (Instituto Nacional de Educación para los Adultos, or INEA), an entity of the Mexican government, to provide adult education in Spanish. INEA oversees the accreditation and certification of basic educational studies in Mexico and is transferrable to some other Latin American countries. Previously referred to as the Mexican GED program, INEA supplies facilities with materials and curriculum for the primaria level (grades 1-6) and secondaria level (grades 7-9). When offenders return to their country of origin, completion of this program prepares them to secure employment more readily, while providing a launching pad for future educational achievement.
• Post-Secondary Opportunities, GRE Preparation and Testing
• In free society, the pathway to educational attainment can extend far beyond the high school level. And it's true within CoreCivic correctional facilities, too. Our classrooms service not only elementary- and secondary-level needs. They also provide opportunities at the collegiate level.
• Inmates may choose to take advantage of post-secondary programs, actually earning college credit and even a degree. Through GRE test prep, inmates may explore post-graduate opportunities, opening the door for advanced degree attainment.
• Vocational Training,
Learning a vocation leads to a new vision in life.
The ability to get and maintain employment is a key ingredient to success upon release.
That's why learning a viable trade is so vital. When offenders learn an in-demand skill, it empowers them to one day become qualified employees, or even self-employed proprietors of their own businesses.
Being able to support themselves helps keep former inmates on the path of a law-abiding life. Being employed instills a sense of purpose and self-esteem. Becoming proficient in a craft bodes well for the respect they may receive in the community.
Industry Work Programs - CoreCivic facilities put inmates to work in modern programs that are aligned closely with outside companies. Work opportunities allow inmates to earn money, learn job skills, and develop a work ethic. Participation in these programs enhances their opportunity to land an honest job after their release. Depending on the facility, the programs are either operated independently or as part of the Federal Prison Industry Enhancement Program.
Microsoft Office Specialist Program - CoreCivic is an authorized testing center for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) program, a globally recognized exam-based proficiency certification in Microsoft applications. MOS certification for Microsoft Office requires passing one or more exams. MOS certification exams provide a valid and reliable measure of technical proficiency and expertise by evaluating overall comprehension of Microsoft Office or Office Project programs, the ability to use advanced features and proficiency in integrating Office programs with other software.
Trades Training - CoreCivic's vocational programs are radically different from the previous generation’s prison work details and odd jobs. Inmates are enrolled in skill-building initiatives that offer meaningful, rewarding opportunities to gain self-esteem. Training programs are designed with an eye on realistic future jobs and careers including:
• Carpentry
• Commercial Driver’s License (CDL)
• Computer applications
• Construction and building trades
• Culinary Arts
• Electrical
• Horticulture and landscaping
• HVAC
• Masonry
• Painting
• Plumbing
• Workforce Readiness
• Veterinary Technician
Life Skills Development - It takes a certain set of skills to successfully navigate everyday life as a responsible, law-abiding citizen. These capabilities are what we in corrections call life skills. CoreCivic's life skills and reentry programs are based on research that has uncovered proven ways to change thinking patterns, resulting in permanent changes in behavior. This is known as the cognitive-behavioral approach. Life Skills training impacts every area of an individual’s life, from coping with emotions to rearing children and from managing money to making decisions.
Cognitive-behavioral classes are designed to help inmates overcome attitude challenges and acting out in negative ways. Our approach follows a tested model of delinquency avoidance, crime prevention and cognitive rehabilitation. Participants learn about logical problem solving and the development of good decision-making skills.
Parenting and Family Dynamics - Many of the men and women in correctional facilities are fathers and mothers. Some statistics indicate that nearly three million children in the U.S. have an incarcerated parent. While it can be challenging to effectively and actively parent while incarcerated, CoreCivic life skills programs strive to introduce and reinforce positive parental lessons that offenders can carry with them upon release. Even while still confined, we instill strategies for inmates to build better relationships with their children as they prepare for family reunification.
CoreCivic's life skills programs focus on every stage in child development, including the role of a parent in helping children succeed in school. Also discussed are the consequences of raising a child in an “at risk” family. Teaching parenting skills and developing cognitive self-change as part of a life skills may not, in isolation, prevent criminal behavior in the inmate, but it likely will assist the child in moving in a new direction instead of following in the parent's path. Together, all of these topics may go a long way toward breaking the cycle of criminal behavior and incarceration.
Budgeting and Financial Management - Being able to smartly manage one's money is a critical skill. Learning how to spend in accordance with a budget can help former offenders withstand the pressures of resorting to illegal activity to earn money.
Poor management of family or personal finances is a major problem that is by no means limited to the incarcerated population. Few, if any, factors lead to broken families more often than financial issues. That’s why budgeting and financial management are a critical part of life skills training. Inmates who can prioritize and stay out of financial trouble are much more likely to be happier and more productive citizens after release.
Occupational Readiness - Getting prepared to enter the workforce involves more than just learning the skills of a trade or earning a certification. CoreCivic's life skills programs have a major focus on employability and occupational readiness that includes:
• Attendance
• Career exploration
• Following instructions
• Hygiene
• Job lead sources
• Proper attire
• Punctuality
• Time management
• Interpersonal Skills
Sometimes, the failure to function and prosper in society can be due to a basic lack of social or interpersonal skills. The simple truth is that many inmates, due to lack of education or lack of exposure to positive role models at home, have communication issues that hamper their success.
That's why life skills training includes a focus on interpersonal skill-building. Inmates are taught about the fundamental need for decency and respect. They learn communications skills and practice them in real-life situations. Programs also focus on independent living skills, anger control and victimization.
• Addictions Treatment and Dependency on alcohol and drugs can lead to devastating consequences for those caught in the destructive grip of addiction to mind-and mood-altering substances and has been overwhelmingly linked to factors that contribute to incarceration.

Inmate Locator

Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Colorado. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

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Visitation Information

Visiting hours for Adams Transitional Center - CoreCivic. For Directions call 720-377-0900

Sunday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Monday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Tuesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Thursday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Federal Holidays 8:00 am - 3:00 pm

No cellphones, you will be searched before visiting. NO personal belongings. Persons under probation, parole, or other community corrections supervision must obtain the permission of both their individual supervising officer and the superintendent prior to a visit. Such visitation is not normally approved.

If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is a family member of the inmate, they must be accompanied by an adult family member or guardian to include a member of the inmate's extended family. If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is not a family member of the inmate, the minor visitor must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

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Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

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