Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole

State Probation and Parole

Last Updated: May 24, 2019
Address
1101 South Front St, Harrisburg, PA 17104
County
Security Level
Administration - no inmates
Phone
800-932-4857
Email
ra-pbppopc@pa.gov
Facility Type
Adult

Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 800-932-4857

This facility is for adult inmates.

ADAMS ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Adams County Courthouse | 117 Baltimore St., Suite 302 | Gettysburg, PA 17325 | Phone: 717.337.9803 | Fax: 717.334.1613
Programs and Services (pdf)


ALLEGHENY ADULT PROBATION OFFICE

564 Forbes Avenue | Manor Building Suite 1212 | Pittsburgh, PA 15219 | Phone: 412.350.2320 | Fax: 412.350.6025
Programs and Services (pdf)


ARMSTRONG COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Courthouse - Room 303 | Kittaning, PA 16201 | Phone: 724.548.3491 | Fax: 724.548.3460
Programs and Services (pdf)


BEAVER COUNTY ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Beaver County Courthouse | 810 Third Street | Beaver, PA 15009 | Phone: 724.773.8600 | Fax: 724.728.0280
Programs and Services (pdf)


BEDFORD COUNTY PROBATION OFFICE

200 South Juliana Street | Bedford, PA 15522 | Phone: 814.623.4830 | Fax: 814.623.0851
Programs and Services (pdf)


ADULT PROBATION AND PAROLE DEPARTMENT

Berks County Juvenile Probation Office | 10th Floor | 633 Court Street | Reading, PA 19601 | Phone: 610.478.3200 Ext. 6437 | Fax: 610.478.3451
Programs and Services (pdf)

BLAIR COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

423 Allegheny Street | Suite 330 | Hollidaysburg, PA 16648-2022 | Phone: 814.693.3190 Ext. 1315 | Fax: 814.695.0483

Programs and Services (pdf)

BRADFORD COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

301 Main Street | Towanda, PA 18848 | Phone: 570.265.1706 | Fax: 570.265.1730

Programs and Services (pdf)

BUCKS COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Bucks County Courthouse - 7th Floor | 55 East Court Street | Doylestown, PA 18901 | Phone: 215.348.6634 | Fax: 215.348.6691

Programs and Services (pdf)

BUTLER COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Butler County Courthouse | P.O. Box 1208 | Butler, PA 16003-1208 | Phone: 724.284.5259 | Fax: 724.284.5480
Programs and Services (pdf

CAMBRIA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

401 Candlelight Drive | Suite 250 | Ebensburg, PA 15931 | Phone: 814.472.4410 | Fax: 814.472.5005
Programs and Services (pdf)

CAMERON COUNTY ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Cameron County Courthouse | 20 East Fifth Street | Emporium, PA 15834 | Phone: 814.486.1559 EXT 339 | Fax: 814.486.2279
Programs and Services (pdf)

CARBON COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

P.O. Box 26 | Jim Thorpe, PA 18229 | Phone: 570.325.4226 | Fax: 570.325.4250
Programs and Services (pdf)

CENTRE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Centre County Courthouse | Room 403 | 102 South Allegheny Street | Bellefonte, PA 16823 | Phone: 814.355.6771 | Fax: 814.355.6897
Programs and Services (pdf)

CHESTER COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

201 West Market Street | Suite 2100 | P.O. Box 2746 | West Chester, PA 19380 | Phone: 610.344.6291 | Fax: 610.344.6321
Programs and Services (pdf)

CLARION COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

500 Main Street | Clarion, PA 16214 | Phone: 814.226.6020 EXT 12 | Fax: 814.226.6027
Programs and Services (pdf)

CLEARFIELD COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Clearfield County Courthouse | Suite 233 | 230 E. Market Street | Clearfield, PA 16830 | Phone: 814.765.2641 | Fax: 814.765.1003
Programs and Services (pdf)

CLINTON COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

230 East Water Street | Lock Haven, PA 17745 | Phone: 570.893.4051 | Fax: 570.893.4149
Programs and Services (pdf)

COLUMBIA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Columbia County Courthouse | 35 West Main Street | P.O. Box 380 | Bloomsburg, PA 17815 | Phone: 570.389.5650 | Fax: 570.389.6320
Programs and Services (pdf)

CRAWFORD COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Crawford County Courthouse | 903 Diamond Park | Meadville, PA 16335 | Phone: 814.333.7350 | Fax: 814.336.3893
Programs and Services (pdf)

CUMBERLAND COUNTY ADULT PROBATION

4 East Liberty Avenue | Carlisle, PA 17013 | Phone: 717.240.6277 | Fax: 717.240.6480
Programs and Services (pdf)

DAUPHIN COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Adult Probation Division | 917 Gibson Boulevard | Steelton, PA 17113 | Phone: 717.780.6900 | Fax: 717.558.1083
Programs and Services (pdf)


DELAWARE COUNTY ADULT PROBATION AND PAROLE SERVICES

Delaware County Courthouse | 201 West Front Street | Media, PA 19063 | Phone: 610.891.4591 | Fax: 610.891.7294
Programs and Services (pdf)

ELK COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Elk County Courthouse | P.O. Box 448 | Ridgway, PA 15853 | Phone: 814.776.5365 | Fax: 814.776.5383
Programs and Services (pdf)

ERIE COUNTY ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Erie County Courthouse - Room 306 | 140 West Sixth Street | Erie, PA 16501 | Phone: 814.451.7068 | Fax: 814.451.6300
Programs and Services (pdf)

FAYETTE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

22 East Main Street | 3rd Floor - Public Service Building | Uniontown, PA 15401 | Phone: 724.430.1251 | Fax: 724.430.1430
Programs and Services (pdf)

FOREST COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Forest County Courthouse | 526 Elm Street, Box 8 | Tionesta, PA 16353 | Phone: 814.755.3851 | Fax: 814.755.7722
Programs and Services (pdf)

FRANKLIN COUNTY ADULT PROBATION

440 Walker Road | Chambersburg, PA 17201-9798 | Phone: 717.264.6262 | Fax: 717.264.8934
Programs and Services (pdf)

FULTON COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Neighborhood Services Building | 116 West Market Street, Suite 104 | McConnellsburg, PA 17233 | Phone: 717.485.3192 | Fax: 717.485.6867
Programs and Services (pdf)

GREENE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Greene County Courthouse - Room 104 | 10 East High Street | Waynesburg, PA 15370 | Phone: 724.852.5250 | Fax: 724.852.5344
Programs and Services (pdf)

HUNTINGDON COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Huntingdon Courthouse Annex II | 430 Penn Street | Huntingdon, PA 16652 | Phone: 814.643.1177 | Fax: 814.643.8190
Programs and Services (pdf)

INDIANA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Indiana County Courthouse, Third Floor | 825 Philadelphia Street | Indiana, PA 15701 | Phone: 724.465.3820 | Fax: 724.465.3831
Programs and Services (pdf)

JEFFERSON COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Jefferson County Courthouse - Room 304 | 200 Main Street | Brookville, PA 15825 | Phone: 814.849.1682 | Fax: 814.849.1669
Programs and Services (pdf)

JUNIATA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Juniata County Courthouse Annex | P.O. Box 68 | Mifflintown, PA 17059 | Phone: 717.436.7716 | Fax: 717.436.7719
Programs and Services (pdf)

LACKAWANNA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

130 North Washington Avenue, Third Floor | Scranton, PA 18503 | Phone: 570.963.6876 | Fax: 570.963.6440
Programs and Services (pdf)

LANCASTER COUNTY ADULT PROBATION AND PAROLE SERVICES

40 East King Street, Third Floor | Lancaster, PA 17603 | Phone: 717.299.8181 | Fax: 717.299.7887
Programs and Services (pdf)

LAWRENCE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Government Center | 430 Court Street | New Castle, PA 16101-3593 | Phone: 724.656.2173 | Fax: 724.656.1989
Programs and Services (pdf)

LEBANON COUNTY PROBATION OFFICE

508 Oak Street | Lebanon, PA 17042 | Phone: 717.273.1557 ext. 104 | Fax: 717.273.9378
Programs and Services (pdf)

LEHIGH COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Lehigh County Courthouse | 455 West Hamilton Street | Allentown, PA 18101-1614 | Phone: 610.782.3378 | Fax: 610.871.2784
Programs and Services (pdf)

LUZERNE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

20 North Pennsylvania Boulevard | Penn Place, Suite 313 | Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 | Phone: 570.825.1728 | Fax: 570.822.7866
Programs and Services (pdf)

LYCOMING COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Lycoming County Courthouse | 48 West Third Street | Williamsport, PA 17701 | Phone: 570.327.2387 | Fax: 570.327.2287
Programs and Services (pdf)

MCKEAN COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

McKean County Courthouse | 500 West Main Street | Smethport, PA 16749 | Phone: 814.887.3305 Fax: 814.887.3340
Programs and Services (pdf)

MERCER COUNTY (NO PROBATION DEPARTMENT)

PA Board of Probation and Parole - Mercer District Office | 8362 Sharon-Mercer Road | Mercer, PA 16137 | Phone: 724.662.2380

MIFFLIN COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Mifflin County Courthouse | 20 North Wayne Street | Lewistown, PA 17044 | Phone: 717.248.3953 | Fax: 717.248.4425
Programs and Services (pdf)

MONROE COUNTY ADULT PROBATION

Monroe County Courthouse | 610 Monroe Street - Suite 102 | Stroudsburg, PA 18360 | Phone: 570.517.3095 | Fax: 570.420.3707
Programs and Services (pdf)

MONTGOMERY COUNTY ADULT PROBATION

100 Ross Road - Suite 120 | King of Prussia, PA 19406 | Phone: 610.992.7777 | Fax: 610.992.7778
Programs and Services (pdf)

MONTOUR COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

29 Mill Street | Danville, PA 17821 | Phone: 570.271.3030 | Fax: 570.271.3049
Programs and Services (pdf)

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY ADULT PROBATION

Criminal Administration Building | 105 South Union Street | Easton, PA 18042-7478 | Phone: 610.559.6800 | Fax: 610.559.6799
Programs and Services (pdf)

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Northumberland County Courthouse | 322 North Second Street, 4th Floor | Sunbury, PA 17801 | Phone: 570.495.2323 | Fax: 570.988.4957
Programs and Services (pdf)

PERRY COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Perry County Courthouse | P.O. Box 239 | New Bloomfield, PA 17068-0239 | Phone: 717.582.5125 | Fax: 717.582.5190
Programs and Services (pdf)

PHILADELPHIA ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

1401 Arch Street, 10th Floor | Philadelphia, PA 19102 | Phone: 215.683.1281 | Fax: 215.683.1280
Programs and Services (pdf)

PIKE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Pike County Administration Building | 506 Broad Street | Milford, PA 18337 | Phone: 570.296.7412 | Fax: 570.296.3560
Programs and Services


POTTER COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

1 North Main Street - Suite 229 | Coudersport, PA 16915 | Phone: 814.274.8791 | Fax: 814.274.7062
Programs and Services (pdf)

SCHUYLKILL COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Schuylkill County Courthouse | 300 N. 3rd Street | Pottsville, PA 17901-2528 | Phone: 570.628.1299 | Fax: 570.628.1009
Programs and Services (pdf)

SNYDER COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Snyder County Courthouse | 9 West Market Street | Middleburg, PA 17842 | Phone: 570.837.4251 | Fax: 570.837.5481
Programs and Services (pdf)

SOMERSET COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

300 North Center Avenue | Suite 100 | Somerset, PA 15501 | Phone: 814.445.1600 | Fax: 814.444.8962
Programs and Services (pdf)

SULLIVAN COUNTY PROBATION/PAROLE DEPARTMENT

1 Courthouse Square | Tunkhannock, PA 18657 | Phone: 570.996.2275 | Fax: 570.836.5345
Programs and Services (pdf)

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Susquehanna County Office Boulevard | 81 Public Avenue | Montrose, PA 18801 | Phone: 570.278.4600 | Fax: 570.278.3778
Programs and Services (pdf)


TIOGA COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Tioga County Courthouse | 118 Main Street | Wellsboro, PA 16901 | Phone: 570.724.9340 | Fax: 570.723.8361
Programs and Services (pdf)


UNION COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Union County Courthouse | 103 South Second Street | Lewisburg, PA 17837 | Phone: 570.524.8741 | Fax: 570.524.8745
Programs and Services (pdf)

VENANGO COUNTY (NO PROBATION DEPARTMENT)

PA Board of Probation and Parole | Mercer District Office | 8362 Sharon-Mercer Road | Mercer, PA 16137 | Phone: 724.662.2380

WARREN COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

204 Fourth Avenue | Warren, PA 163658431 | Phone: 814.728.3528 | Fax: 814.728.3467
Program and Services (pdf)


WASHINGTON COUNTY ADULT PROBATION OFFICE

Family Court Center, Suite 413 | 29 West Cherry Avenue | Washington, PA 15301 | Phone: 724.228.6860 | Fax: 724.229.5912
Programs and Services (pdf)


WAYNE COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

Wayne County Courthouse | 925 Court Street | Honesdale, PA 18431 | Phone: 570.253.5970 | Fax: 570.251.8243
Programs and Services (pdf)


WESTMORELAND COUNTY ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT

2 North Main Street, Suite 303 | Greensburg, PA 15601 | Phone: 724.830.3723 | Fax: 724.830.3449
Programs and Services (pdf)


WYOMING COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

1 Courthouse Square | Tunkhannock, PA 18657 | Phone: 570.996.2275 | Fax: 570.836.5345
Programs and Services (pdf)


YORK COUNTY PROBATION DEPARTMENT

York County Judicial Center - 2nd Floor | 45 North George Street | York, PA 17401 | Phone: 717.771.3843 | Fax: 717.771.9846
Programs and Services (pdf)

REENTRY PROCESS: PLANNING BEGINS AT ADMISSION

Reentry planning for an individual’s return to their community begins on day one of incarceration. Upon admission to state prison, the PA Department of Corrections (DOC) conducts a battery of assessments to determine the inmate's risk of reoffending; propensity to act violently; levels of criminal attitudes and hostility; problems with substance abuse; and general psychological well-being.

Based on the results of these assessments, a plan is developed to address necessary treatment and programming needs for effective rehabilitation of the inmate. It is up to each individual to follow the plan that has been developed specifically to meet his or her needs. The DOC assigns a counselor to monitor individual progress in specific programs or treatment.

The DOC delivers cognitive behavioral programming to address identified needs. Some specific cognitive behavioral interventions within the DOC include:

• Thinking for Change – addresses criminal thinking
• Violence prevention
• Batter’s intervention – addresses domestic violence
• Sexual offender treatment and programming
• Drug and alcohol therapeutic community treatment

Educational and vocational programs are available as well. The offender should talk to a counselor about a GED or college diploma, vocational training, parenting classes, basic life skills courses, and how to get involved in other positive programs or activities within the prison. Returning home successfully requires work by each offender.

ELIGIBILITY FOR PAROLE

As a discretionary parole state, a judge imposes a minimum and maximum sentence date at the time of sentencing. Inmates who have served their minimum sentence are eligible for parole consideration. Parole is not guaranteed – it is a privilege, not a right.

WHEN IS AN INMATE INTERVIEWED AND RELEASED ON PAROLE?

The Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole (board) interviews inmates four months prior to the minimum sentence date. Although the parole process, including the interview, is begun prior to the minimum sentence date, state sentenced inmates must serve the minimum amount of time in prison before they can be released on parole and will remain on parole supervision until their maximum sentence date. The completion of the minimum sentence date does not create a right, presumption or reasonable expectation of parole.

WRITING A LETTER TO THE BOARD ABOUT AN INMATE

If you would like to send a letter to the board about an inmate who is being considered for parole, your letter needs to include the following:

• The inmate’s first and last name
• The inmate’s inmate/institution number (is 2 letters first followed by 4 numbers)
• The state correctional facility where they are housed

The board must have the inmate’s name AND some other form of identifying information such as the date of birth or the inmate/institution number to make certain the letter is placed in the correct offender’s file.

If you do not know the inmate number or the institution where they are currently incarcerated, you may find this information on the Department of Corrections website INMATE LOCATOR. This site will provide both the inmate/institution number and the state correctional facility where they are housed for you to use in your letter. Below is an example of a possible letter about an inmate:

John J. Inmate
Inmate # ZZ1234
SCI-Graterford

To Whom It May Concern:
[ Insert the text of what you want the board to know about the inmate here.]
Thank you.

Sincerely,


Your First and Last Name
Your Address
Your Phone Number


After you complete your letter, mail it to the state correctional institution where the inmate currently is being held. Addresses for the institutions are located on the Department of Corrections' website.
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS WEB PAGE FOR STATE PRISON ADDRESSES

DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS WEB PAGE FOR COUNTY PRISON ADDRESSES

INTERVIEW PREPARATION

INTERVIEW

SUPERVISION

VIOLATIONS

THE PAROLE REENTRY FLOWCHART (PDF)

PAROLEES AND FAMILIES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

PREPARING FOR YOUR RELEASE: THE KEY TO STARTING OVER

As a person who wants to leave your criminal past behind and rebuild your life, it is important that you realize that returning home to your community is a process that begins from the day you enter prison.

Begin preparing now. Put your time to good use.

It is up to you to follow the correctional plan that has been developed specifically to meet your needs. The Department of Corrections (DOC) will assign you a counselor who will monitor your progress in specific programs or treatment.

It is up to you to take advantage of educational and vocational programs that will help you after you are released. Talk to your counselor about a GED or college diploma, vocational training, parenting classes, basic life skills courses, and how you can get involved in other positive programs or activities within the prison.

Returning home successfully requires work, but it will be rewarding.

For you to be successful when you leave prison, it is important that you maintain connections to your family, and/or religious or community organizations that are willing to assist parolees with reentry into the community. They will help you find solutions to problems and help you to live a safe and healthy life.

This network of support may help you find a place to live and a job, two very important parts of the reentry process. Employment will enable you to support yourself and your children, if any, and keep you on the track to a new lifestyle.

One such organization is WIC ~ Women, Infants and Children. Submit a WIC pre-application online. The WIC office closest to your family will contact you for an appointment and answer any questions you might have.

When you are released, get in touch with those individuals and organizations that you kept in contact with while in prison that can support your positive reentry into society. They can help you once you return home.

To help you adjust, get involved in local organizations. Find ways to give back to your community. Avoid individuals and organizations that will encourage you to get re-involved in criminal activity.

Your parole agent can help you and your family after you are released. Parole’s goal is to help you be successful. After you are released on parole, talk to your parole agent about your activities and get his or her support.

Remember - there are many agencies, programs and people waiting to help you succeed!

WHAT OFFENDERS AND FAMILIES NEED TO KNOW BOOKLET

YOUR RETURN HOME

HOME PLAN APPROVAL

HOME PLAN INVESTIGATIONS

INMATE OBLIGATIONS

PAROLE CONDITIONS

EFFECTIVE SUPERVISION

Many strategies are used to keep offenders in a pattern of success, strategies derived from a wide body of correctional research known as evidence based practices (EBP) or the Principles of Effective Intervention that promise significant reductions in offender recidivism.

Evidence based practices expert, Mark Carey (The Carey Group) (pdf) has provided training on this topic to both line staff on how to incorporate these skills into practice and supervisors on how to reinforce the use of EBP skills. These strategies are used throughout the entire parole process, but they become especially important during field supervision to make sure that any progress an offender has made is maintained effectively.

DETERMINE RISK/NEEDS USING ACTUARIAL ASSESSMENTS

The research shows that using actuarial assessments to determine risk and needs is superior to using unguided clinical judgment. Even experienced clinicians are correct in predicting outcomes only about half the time whereas assessments are accurate approximately 70%-80% of the time.

The Board of Probation and Parole (Board) uses the LSI-R as its primary field risk/needs assessment. The LSI-R is used in over 500 jurisdictions around the world. The Board has contracted with experts such as Dr. James Austin (JFA Associates) (pdf) to conduct validation research on the LSI-R, and Dr. David Simourd (ACES, Inc.) (pdf) to provide staff with ongoing LSI-R training on appropriate use of the assessment. The Board also uses the Static 99 to assess the risk of sexual reoffending and has received training from experts such as Dr. R. Karl Hanson (Canada Public Safety) (pdf) on appropriate use.

More recently, the Board instituted the use of an Offender Violent Risk Typology tool to create classifications for propensity for violence with the assistance of Dr. John Goldkamp (Temple University). (pdf) The Board is looking to improve in this area as it is currently contracting with Dr. Richard Berk (University of Pennsylvania) (pdf) to create a “violence forecasting model.”

ENHANCE INTRINSIC MOTIVATION

Research has demonstrated that lasting change is more likely only if the subject of the change has an internal desire to do so. External factors, such as threats of incarceration, are much more likely to have short term effects. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a style of communication that has been proven effective at enhancing intrinsic motivation and moving offenders through the various stages of change. The Board has contracted with Michael Clark, MSW (Center for Strength-Based Strategies) (pdf) to train staff on utilizing this skill. Additionally, Mr. Clark’s company has trained a number of Board staff to train others on Motivational Interviewing.

TARGET INTERVENTIONS

This principle is comprised of five subcategories: Risk, Need, Responsivity, Dosage, and Treatment. Risk-Need-Responsivity (RNR) is the backbone of EBP. The Risk Principle states that resources should be targeted to higher risk offenders. Correctional agencies should focus their finite resources on the offender group that is most likely to present a risk to society. By utilizing the LSI-R to determine risk and subsequently basing supervision levels on the LSI-R score, the Board adheres to this principle.

The Need Principle states that interventions should target identified criminogenic needs. The relationship between correctly targeting criminogenic needs and reduced recidivism is among the strongest found in social science research. The Board accomplishes this by incorporating the results of the LSI-R into offender case plans. Policy requires that case plans be reviewed and progress in each criminogenic deficiency be addressed on an annual basis.

The Responsivity Principle states that treatment interventions be delivered in a manner to which the offender is most likely to be responsive. This includes using cognitive-behavioral programming in general, and specifically matching interventions to the offender’s personality traits, gender, learning style, motivation, culture, etc.

Dosage is closely related to the Risk Principle in that agencies should assure that supervision and treatment are commensurate to an offender’s level of risk/need, and treatment is closely related to the Responsivity Principle in that treatment interventions must be targeted, timely, and delivered with fidelity.

TRAIN FOR SKILLS WITH DIRECTED PRACTICE

Many offenders lack the skills needed to live law abiding lifestyles. Cognitive behavioral programming (pdf) has been proven to be an effective method of training people how to make changes that are lasting. Cognitive behavioral treatment is based on the premise that thoughts, attitudes and beliefs strongly influence how one acts. Accordingly, training offenders on alternatives to criminal/anti-social thinking, attitudes, and beliefs and practicing pro-social responses can reduce the likelihood of criminal behavior. The Board contracted with the National Curriculum and Training Institute to have staff trained on delivering cognitive behavioral groups. Cognitive life skills, violence prevention, anger management, and drug/alcohol groups are offered by Board staff in all 10 districts.

INCREASE REWARDS

Research on social learning theory has shown that rewards are more effective than punishments in shaping behavior. In fact, issuing four rewards to every punishment is the optimum balance for shaping behavior. Rewards do not have to be tangible—a simple statement of appreciation for improvements made can be quite influential under the right circumstances. One basic—yet important—MI skill (see “Enhance Intrinsic Motivation”) is to use affirmations. Just by utilizing MI, the Board has taken a significant step in satisfying this principle. Field staff are encouraged to look for ways to reward offenders. For example, offenders who display significant, sustained reductions in risk of reoffending may be relieved of certain conditions of parole (IE: reduced reporting). Recently, the legislature authorized the Board to utilize administrative parole. Staff needs two contacts per year for offenders under this supervision. It is reserved for non-violent offenders who have a very low risk of reoffending.

ENGAGE OFFENDERS IN NATURAL COMMUNITIES

Research shows that interventions can be more effective in the community than in prison. This finding is strengthened when offenders have stronger support in their natural communities. PBPP field supervision is community-based as field agents are generally working in the field 80% of the time. Additionally, Board policy requires agents to make a certain amount of collateral contacts for each offender. This requirement allows the agents to make meaningful contacts with individuals who comprise the offender’s support system and engage them in the supervision process when possible.

MEASURE RELEVANT PRACTICES AND PROCESSES/PROVIDE MEASUREMENT FEEDBACK

It is important for agencies to measure what they want to see accomplished and share feedback with the staff who are charged with achieving those accomplishments. Research shows that doing so is associated with increased motivation. The Board’s research and development division runs a number of reports on a regular basis to accomplish this.

OFFENDERS ARE INDIVIDUALS AND HAVE DIFFERENT NEEDS AND CHALLENGES

MANAGING PAROLE VIOLATORS

Most offenders can be safely and effectively managed in the community where they are connected with family and resources. However, parolees who are a serious threat to themselves or others, or who have protracted and escalating violations or have a new criminal arrest, are returned to prison. That said, not all violations amount to serious threats that require return to prison. The Board is committed to managing violations in a manner that enhances public safety, and this calls for a wide range of responses to violative behavior.

The Board is committed to correcting minor rule violations when doing so will work toward the goal of successful reentry. When technical violations (violations of parole conditions), are detected, they are addressed with swiftness and certainty. In order to assure that the manner in which technical violations are addressed is proportional and consistent, the Board utilizes a Violation Sanctioning Grid (VSG). (pdf) This tool was developed in collaboration with a national expert on technical parole violator management, Peggy Burke (Center for Effective Public Policy). (pdf)

The Violation Sanctioning Grid (VSG) (pdf) considers an offender’s risk to reoffend, severity of their violative behavior, and type of criminogenic (crime-producing) needs displayed to fashion a recommended response. Some offenders may have a high risk to reoffend and/or their violation might be to such a degree that it is no longer safe to manage them in the community. These offenders are placed in a secure setting.

Many offenders, however, can be redirected by using intermediate sanctions (interventions that do not involve reincarceration) to address violations. These sanctions can be particularly effective at correcting behavior when they address criminogenic needs. This approach has resulted in a 10% reduction in the rate of reincarceration as the result of technical violations over the past four fiscal years. The VSG offers over 31 different recommended interventions to include: increased reporting requirements; imposition of curfew; imposition of electronic monitoring; referral to drug/alcohol treatment; documented job search; and travel restrictions.

PAROLEE REENTRY

REENTRY PROCESS

FOR PAROLEES AND THEIR FAMILIES

PAROLE CASE EXAMPLE

PAROLE DICTIONARY

VETERANS SUPPORT

VOTING RIGHTS

Thank you for trying AMP!

You got lucky! We have no ad to show to you!

Inmate Locator

Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Pennsylvania. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

Visitation Information

Visiting hours for Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole. For Directions call 800-932-4857

Sunday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Monday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Tuesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Wednesday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Thursday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Friday 8:00 am - 9:00 pm
Saturday 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
Federal Holidays 8:00 am - 3:00 pm

No cellphones, you will be searched before visiting. NO personal belongings. Persons under probation, parole, or other community corrections supervision must obtain the permission of both their individual supervising officer and the superintendent prior to a visit. Such visitation is not normally approved.

If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is a family member of the inmate, they must be accompanied by an adult family member or guardian to include a member of the inmate's extended family. If the visitor is under the age of 18 and is not a family member of the inmate, the minor visitor must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.

Thank you for trying AMP!

You got lucky! We have no ad to show to you!

Facility Type

The Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole located at 1101 South Front St supervises offenders on probation/parole supervision for numerous types of offenses, with a primary focus of facilitating community safety and working with offenders to rehabilitate their behavior and reintegrate into the community. The Harrisburg office also has specialized caseloads/units that address the special supervision needs of sex offender and mentally ill offenders. The Harrisburg office continues to research and implement new and more innovative programming/interventions that will help to be even more productive in carrying out the mission of Pennsylvania Probation and Parole.

Thank you for trying AMP!

You got lucky! We have no ad to show to you!

How To Send Things

There are strict procedures for everything related to "sending things to an inmate" in a facility. This includes sending money for commissary packages, sending mail like letters with photos, magazine subscriptions, buying phone time, postcards and greeting cards, and even distance learning courses (get your degree, you've got a lot of extra time). You also need to know about visitation, what are the hours and rules.

All of the information you could ever need to know is below, patiently scroll the page and get as much information about Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole that you'd ever want to know. If there is anything that you were looking for, but don't see, please email us at aid@inmateaid.com.

How To Send Money:

How to Send an Inmate Money in Pennsylvania

Here are some general guidelines for sending money to an inmate's trust account; but not specific to a particular facility, institution or jail. Inmates need money to access several privileges like weekly shopping at the commissary, making phone calls, using the email service where offered, using the electronic tablets where offered and paying their co-pay when needing the medical or dental services. Some county jails require a per-night fee for the jail’s expenses.

What is a Commissary?

A commissary is a store within the jail. Commissary day is usually held once a week and can only be used if the inmate has funds in their commissary account, like a bank account within the institution. If the inmate has a job, their paycheck is deposited into this account, too.

The Commissary sells various products that the inmates may purchase if they have money on their books. Items sold are clothing, shoes, snacks and food, as well as hygienic products like soap, shampoo, and shavers. The commissary also sells products like books, magazines, televisions, radios, playing cards, headphones, MP3 players, electronic tablets, songs and educational programming. They also sell paper, envelopes, and stamps allowing the inmate to write their loved ones, friends and family. Facilities will provide stamps and paper to inmates who are indigent – eligible where no money has been in their commissary account for at least 30 days.

How you send money to an inmate?

Sending money to an inmate varies from state to state, depending if it is county, state or federal, their ways of accepting money for inmates’ changes by the money transfer company they’ve contracted with. Federal Prisons and some state-level prisons have centralized banking systems which means that you do not need to know where they are specifically, just that they are in the state systems of for instance the California, Texas, Florida DOC or the FBOP to name a few.

How do I send money using MoneyGram?

Some facilities will allow you to deposit cash through the lobby window stand-alone kiosk in the lobby or visitation room. Most facilities will also accept a postal money order mailed to the institution’s inmate mailing address made payable to the full inmate’s name.

Electronic banking allows friends and family members to send the funds online, and correctional departments are starting to favor this method because it is less work for staff and more accurate/easier to keep track of, as well as being more convenient.

Regardless of the method of sending funds, there are several key things you will need to know:
• Inmate’s full committed name
• Inmate’s ID number
• Inmate’s location – or a system like the federal BOP

Before sending any funds you should find out what online transfer companies the institution your inmate is incarcerated in uses. You can find this information on our site by navigating to the facilities page click on the Money Transfer button under the address and phone number.

Pay close attention to the rules of the facility. Sometimes they will require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time, but in federal, there is no limit.

MoneyGram, JPay, OffenderConnect, AccessCorrections, JailATM, WU, Touchpayonline, tigercommissary, smartdeposit are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities. MoneyGram is by far the oldest and most trusted.

Who else can access the money you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution will be subject to commissary/trust account garnishment. If the inmate has these financial obligations, they will be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It may be a percentage or the entire amount depending on the situation. We recommend inmates who are going into their bid contact the counselor and make an arrangement beforehand. If you go in knowing they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is better than have them take it all and you find out in the commissary line when the account is zero.

Why is my inmate asking for more than I normally send?

This is generally a signal that the inmate is doing something they shouldn’t and need money to get them out of or through a situation. It could be gambling, it could be extortion it could be other things you don’t need to know on this forum (for now). Set boundaries with your inmate. Tell them that “this is the amount I can send each month” and that is it. There are no extras beyond the boundary. Also, NEVER send money to the account of another inmate on your inmate’s instruction. This is a sign that something is not right. If the corrections people discover this, and they do more times than not, it will result in some severe disciplinary action to the inmate, and certainly the loss of all privileges.

Who can I call if I suspect something?

We recommend speaking with the counselor or case manager of the facility and use a generic reference in the event that your suspicions are wrong. You needn’t put them in a more difficult position if they are.

Inmate Care Packages:

How to Buy Inmate Commissary Care Packages Online

Show your loved one how much you care – order a package today! The facilities usually have a weekly limit of about $100 per inmate, plus processing and tax. The orders do NOT count towards the inmates weekly commissary allowances Deposits can be made online for inmates 24/7 using a credit/debit card

There are also a few services that allow you how to order inmate commissary online. These trusted providers are approved and share revenue with the prisons from the sales to the inmates.

Here is a list of other similar programs prison commissary: Keefe Group, Access Securpak, iCareGifts, Union Supply Direct, Walkenhorst's, CareACell

Inmate Commissary:

What is Inmate Commissary?

Prison commissary (also sometimes referred to as inmate canteen) is a store for inmates housed within a correctional facility. While the very most basics may be provided for by a given correctional department, there are also other important goods/services that Florida prisoners and inmates must buy. For instance, supplies such as supplementary food, female hygiene products, books, writing utensils and a plethora of other things are examples of things that can be purchased as part of an inmate commissary packages for goods.

What is an Inmate trust account?

When you add money to an inmate account, the prison funds are stored on an inmate trust fund. This prison account basically acts as a personal bank account of an inmate. They will use this account to make Inmate Calls, pay for postage to Send Photos from Inmates, send emails from inmates, purchase Items from Commissary, receive wages from jobs, and more.

How To Send Mail:

This is how to send your inmate at Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole letters, photos, postcards, greeting cards and magazines

Incoming and outgoing inmate mail is subject to inspection for the presence of contraband that might threaten the safety, security or well-being of the jail/facility, its staff, and residents. Inmates may receive only metered, unstamped, plain white postcards no larger than 4" x 6" as mail. Writing must be in pencil or blue or black ink. Any other mail will be returned to the sender. If no return address is available, unauthorized mail will be stored in the inmate's locker until the inmate's release.

Inmate mail cannot contain any of the following: Create an immediate threat to jail order by describing the manufacture of weapons, bombs, incendiary devices, or tools for escape that realistically are a danger to jail security; Advocate violence, racial supremacy or ethnic purity; No current inmate-to-inmate mail will be allowed and will be destroyed.

The easiest workaround is to look over the mailing services of InmateAid. We have an automated system for sending your loved one that special message or picture. We send thousands of pieces of mail per month with NO issues with the prisons or jails. The envelopes display the InmateAid logo, the mail room knows for certain that the contents will not be compromising. This trust was established in 2012.

How To Send Greeting Cards and Postcards:

Greeting cards are great for the holidays and birthdays. The ones from the store often have more than just the message because the policies surrounding appropriate content (no nudity or sexually suggestive material no matter how funny), and they cannot have glitter, stickers or anything else that makes the card different from a normal plain old card. Instead of going to the Hallmark store in the mall and looking around for hours - go to our easy to search Greeting Cards service.

It takes literally 45 seconds and it's very affordable for what you're getting (and what they are getting, too!). Select from 100s of birthday, anniversary and every holiday you can think of, and VERY easy to send from your phone on InmateAid:

Don't forget Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, New Year's, Ramadan, Hanukkah, Passover, Easter, Kwanzaa or Valentine's Day!

In less than a minute and only $0.99, this act of kindness will be worth a million to your inmate. If you have a picture or two and don't want to write a long letter. Type out a little love in the message box and send your latest selfie... only 99 cents!

Don't wait until the moment has passed, it's easy and convenient to let them know you're thinking of them at every moment.

How To Send magazines and Books:

Send magazines to Pennsylvania Board of Probation and Parole at 1101 South Front St, Harrisburg, PA

Send the best magazines and books to your Inmate in jail or prison, it's the gift that keeps on giving all year round, There is nothing more exciting to an inmate (besides their release date) than getting their favorite magazine every month at mail call.

Magazines and books must come directly from the publisher. You are not allowed to send single magazines in an envelope. They need to come directly from the publisher with your inmate's name affixed to the address label. Magazine subscriptions are easy to set up, it takes literally 2 minutes.

You know when you go into the grocery and browse the new magazines on display? You see hundreds. Inside they place a little card that if you fill it out and send it in with your inmate's name, ID number and facility address - you drop it in the mail and in 8-12 weeks your inmate gets an issue every month for a whole year. Thankfully, there is an easier way, just CLICK here and browse yourself. Select a title or two and add your inmate's name to the order. It's fast, it's reliable and it's at a discounted rate for your convenience.

How To Save Money on Inmate Calls

The prison phone companies have a monopoly at the facility they have a contract with. Profits are shared so there is no incentive for their representatives to show you how to save money. They post their rates and in almost every case, there are at least two pricing tiers. Depending on where you are and where your inmate is, the type of phone number you use will make all the difference.

In federal prison, the answer is simply that a new local number will change your inmate's call rate from $.21 per minute to only $.06 per minute. Fed gives you only 300 minutes per month, the local line service is only $8.95, no hidden fees or bundling of other unwanted service charges

For the other facilities that are not federal, it used to be that a local number was the answer. Now, its market intelligence and InmateAid has made it their business to know what the best deal is in every scenario. And we can tell you that in 30% of the cases, we cannot save you a penny - and neither can anyone else. But we will give you a refund if we can't save you money.

For more specific information on inmate calls, you will want to navigate to the facility your inmate is incarcerated in through our site by going to Prison Directory and following the links to the Discount Telephone Service - get an honest estimate before you buy.

Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

Great Deals For You and Your Inmate