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Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic

Private Facility

Last Updated: April 23, 2021
Address
2604 West Woodland Ridge Drive, Lecanto, FL 34461
Beds
760
County
Citrus
Phone
352-527-3332
Fax
352-527-6561

Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic is for Private Facility offenders sentenced up to twelve months.

All prisons and jails have Security or Custody levels depending on the inmate’s classification, sentence, and criminal history. Please review the rules and regulations for MEDIUM - general facility.

The phone carrier is PayTel, to see their rates and best-calling plans for your inmate to call you.

If you are unsure of your inmate's location, you can search and locate your inmate by typing in their last name, first name or first initial, and/or the offender ID number to get their accurate information immediately Registered Offenders

Satellite View of Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic

Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 352-527-3332

The inmates housed at Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic located at 2604 West Woodland Ridge Drive in Lecanto, FL are placed according to their custody level and are incarcerated by a private company contracted by a government agency and are paid a per diem or monthly rate, either for each inmate in the facility or for each bed available. The facility is well-trained and well-staffed. This doesn't come without some controversy as the "price of incarceration" is big business and critics claim there is a monetary benefit to keeping people locked up. The flip side is this facility undergoes rigorous inspections and are some of the be maintained in the US.

For inmates that show a willingness to learn new things, there are educational and vocational training programs here that will prepare them for a successful reentry when released.

Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic - Visitation and Inmate Information

Customer base: Citrus County, FL; U.S. Marshals Service; U.S. Virgin Islands

Serving the Families of Inmates
Incarceration affects many lives.
When a loved one goes to jail or prison, we know there are family members who care deeply and want to remain informed. Sometimes incarceration can mean separation from spouses or children. We know maintaining bonds with healthy relationships are so important. Even friends and church or community members often want to stay connected to inmates in our care.
We welcome those relationships and connections. Because when an inmate remains connected to supportive individuals, they are better equipped and motivated to return to society and make positive changes.
CoreCivic’s mission is to benefit and protect all we serve. We seek to provide the highest-quality correctional services. Our commitment is to operate a safe and secure environment, to offer proven reentry programs that influence change, superior medical services, fair and ethical inmate treatment and oversight, and open and transparent access to our facilities.
While we encourage families to play an active role in an inmate’s life during incarceration, it is also our responsibility to ensure the safety of the inmates in our care, our staff, the community and all facility visitors. We are tirelessly committed to security at each of our facilities, nationwide.
Our security measures may seem overwhelming or intimidating, especially to someone entering a correctional facility for the very first time. So, this section of our website is here to help you become as comfortable and informed as possible.

Inmate Orientation
Within the first two weeks of arrival at a CoreCivic correctional facility, every inmate will attend the facility’s orientation program and receive a copy of the facility’s inmate handbook.
The inmate handbook includes all the information an inmate needs to start a productive life inside the facility and remain connected with family or lawyers.
A few handbook topics include:
• Requesting a medical appointment/available medical services
• Religious services
• Educational programs
• Recreation
• Commissary and creating an account
• Hygiene and grooming expectations
• Facility schedule
• Visitation information and schedule
Orientation and the inmate handbook ensure that inmates in our care can immediately address any concerns or questions and begin to participate in the programs and services offered at our facility.
Operations Concern Center
At all times, we remain committed to the fair and ethical treatment of those individuals entrusted to our care.
CoreCivic has in place clear and accessible processes for inmates and family members to make grievances known that include a dedicated telephone and email hotline. We investigate all allegations fully and cooperate and collaborate with other agencies and law enforcement, as needed.
Protecting Inmate and Detainee Rights
At CoreCivic, we take very seriously our responsibility to respect and uphold the rights and welfare of inmates and detainees in our care. Our employees learn about the company’s longstanding inmate and detainee rights policies in their initial, pre-service training and are refreshed on those commitments every year through in-service training. The information is clearly stated in CoreCivic’s employee handbook, and the policies are also shared with every inmate and detainee who enters one of our facilities. Equally as important, we fully comply with any and all inmate and detainee rights policies our government partners require.
Our dedicated employees – including chaplains, nurses, teachers and officers – are committed to ensuring that every individual in our CoreCivic facilities has:
Safety and Security
• Protection from personal abuse and injury, verbal abuse, corporal punishment, property damage and harassment. For example, CoreCivic has a robust sexual abuse prevention program in place
• Freedom from unreasonable searches.
• Protection from an inmate or detainee having power or authority over another.
• Separate housing for males and females when both sexes are housed in the same facility.

Inmate Wellness
Corrections provides inmates and detainees with the opportunity to pause and assess their lifestyles. For many, incarceration marks the first time in their adult lives when they will have seen a medical professional or received a regular and balanced diet. At CoreCivic, we are proud to offer life-changing services that will enable men and women to find healthy paths toward wellness. We do this through a wide array of options, including:

Nutrition Services
Mealtime is very important in our everyday lives. Food is known as such an important aspect of correctional operations that it is often directly tied to inmate behavior and morale. Not only do breakfast, lunch and dinner help provide daily structure and routines, they also have an impact on overall health and wellness.
Nutrition service is a vital aspect of CoreCivic operations. Guided by our individual government partners, CoreCivic takes great care to offers meals that support specialized diets and cultural preferences, while conforming to rigorous nutritional guidelines. Our team of culinary experts relies on a library of nearly 700 recipes to meet the dietary needs of those in our care. All meals provided at CoreCivic facilities are reviewed and approved by registered dietitians. On a daily basis, we provide meals that support religious diets and more than a dozen therapeutic diets. In fact, seven percent of those is our care receive specialized therapeutic diets that serve to support wellness for a wide array of medical conditions, including high blood pressure, diabetes, pregnancy, and autoimmune diseases.
For many, incarceration serves as a much-needed opportunity to receive consistent access to quality nutrition services. When people have access to sufficient food, they are able to make better choices, increase learning abilities, and combat various health issues. Through something as fundamental as food, we are able to help guide inmates down a path toward health and wellness, both while in our care and after their release.

Health Care
All too often, for many offenders, the first time they receive comprehensive health care is upon becoming incarcerated.
Upon intake at a CoreCivic facility, inmates are screened so that our medical professionals may manage existing concerns and address any new diagnoses. A typical CoreCivic facility has a medical unit where physicians, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and medical assistants can provide routine check-ups, manage sick calls and address non-emergency needs. Our correctional health care facilities typically include a dental clinic, too.
For offenders who experience mental health problems, from emotional conflict to mental illness, we have a team of qualified mental health professionals to assist them with their needs. Offenders are screened upon arrival at each facility, and if needed, they're referred to a psychologist, psychiatrist or mental health specialist for follow-up evaluation and intervention. We provide treatment in the form of medication, when needed, as well as group and individual counseling. All CoreCivic staff receive training in the identification of mental health crises, and they refer offenders to the professional staff whenever they suspect someone is experiencing a problem. We constantly monitor the offender population for signs of declining mental health and suicide risk, working actively to assist a troubled offender in his or her time of need.
CoreCivic adheres to standardized regulations and/or are certified by the American Correctional Association, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and/or the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. These organizations work to improve the quality of health care provided in jails and prisons by developing and maintaining nationally recognized standards for correctional health care.
Our correctional health care teams are supported by a regional network of medical professionals across the country and are led by a talented team at the company's headquarters. Additionally, CoreCivic facilities leverage medical technology to securely automate medical records, scheduling, medication administration, pill call and pharmacy services.

Wellness Activities
Recreational opportunities help provide relief and respite to those in our care. At CoreCivic facilities, recreational outlets are designed to help inmates stay active, get fit and interact with fellow offenders in positive, collaborative ways. Sports like basketball, activities like board games and hobbies like creative writing or knitting help inmates tap into their creativity while learning valuable lessons in teamwork, communication and mutual respect.
Within CoreCivic correctional facilities, recreational activities are managed and overseen by CoreCivic professionals, not limited to but including chaplains, unit managers, recreational supervisors and others. Our devoted and trained volunteers also contribute valuable recreational programs like crafts, reading groups and other enjoyable pastimes to offenders in our correctional centers.

Staying in Touch
Staying in touch with an inmate can be challenging due to time limitations, especially when your loved one is located a considerable distance away.
Sometimes frequent visitation simply isn’t possible. Even so, staying in touch can make all the difference.
We believe that maintaining connections with friends and family makes a positive impact on the inmates in our care – behaviorally, emotionally and academically – and increases their success rate upon release. Success stories make our day.
• We invite you to visit.
• We invite you to write and call.
• We invite you to be involved and connected.
• Telephone Calls and Phone Cards
• Hearing the sounds of a familiar voice can lift an inmate’s spirits. Typically, our correctional facilities allow inmates to make collect calls.
• Each facility has a bank of phones that are provided for inmate calls. Inmates may use these phones to make collect calls or use their pre-paid calling card.
• Detailed information on how your loved one can apply money to their calling card is provided in the inmate handbook and will vary by facility.
Mail
Written mail through the U.S. Postal Service is perhaps one of the easiest ways for friends and family to stay in touch with their loved one. Every facility provides mail service for the inmate population.
Guidelines for addressing mail correctly can be found on the webpage for each specific facility.
While standard letters and cards are generally acceptable at every facility, all other allowable mail will vary from facility to facility.
The majority of our facilities will not allow packages (anything larger than a standard letter or card) from friends and family into the facility. Unapproved mail may result in an expense to the inmate if the item has to be shipped back, destroyed or donated.
Some facilities will allow friends and family members to purchase items from an approved vendor (such as Amazon). The package can be mailed directly from the approved vendor to the facility.
Email access is not available at this time.

Inmate Accounts and Commissary
Inmates may need or receive money for various facility life activities, such as a calling card, medical co-pays, items from commissary, or even a paying job. Inmate money is managed through inmate accounts.
Generally, all our facilities have a commissary, which is an in-facility storehouse where food items, hygiene items and writing materials can be purchased. This is in addition to the meals and standard-issue clothing and hygiene products already supplied by and paid for by the facility. Inmates use the money in their inmate account to purchase these items.
Typically, friends and family may contribute money to an inmate’s account. Many of the facility profiles have instructions for contributing to an inmate account.


Inmate Locator

Citrus County Detention Facility - CoreCivic publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Florida. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

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Visitation Information

Citrus County Detention Facility – CoreCivic - Visitation

Visitation must be scheduled 24 hours in advance. Visitors must arrive 30 minutes prior to their scheduled visit time.

Sunday:
Outside Male Workers & USM 9:45 AM-11:45 AM
Juveniles & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM
Monday:
Misdemeanors & USM 9:45 AM- 11:45 AM
Felons & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM
Tuesday: Felons & USM 9:45 AM- 11:45 AM
High Risk/ PC/ETC & USM 1:15 PM – 3:15 PM
Wednesday:
Felons & USM 9:45 AM – 11:45 AM
Females & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM
Thursday:
Felons & USM 9:45AM – 11:45AM
Felons & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM
Friday: High Risk/PC/ETC & USM 9:45 AM – 11:45 AM
Felons & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM
Saturday:
Females & USM 9:45 AM- 11:45 AM
Misdemeanors & USM 1:15 PM- 3:15 PM

Who can visit?
Inmates are allowed one (1) visitation day per week. Inmates may receive visits from up to 6 persons during any one visit. They will be split into groups of 2 at a time.

Each person visiting must not:
• Have not been incarcerated at the Citrus County Detention Facility within the last 365 days from the date of the visit.
• jeopardize the security or safety of the facility.

How do I get approved for visitation?
N/A

How do minors get approved to visit?
A natural parent/legal guardian accompanying a minor must present the original birth certificate/ legal guardianship papers. A minor not accompanied by a natural parent, must have the original birth certificate and a notarized statement from the natural parent stating:
• that the child is allowed to enter the facility for visitation
• the name of the person who will accompany the child
• the name of the Inmate they will be visiting Minors must remain with the person accompanying them at all times and behave appropriately so as not to disturb other visitors.

How long does the application process take?
N/A

How will I know if I've been approved?
N/A What are the days and times of visitation?
Visitation must be scheduled 24 hours in advance. Visitors must arrive 30 minutes prior to their scheduled visit time.

How long can I visit?
Visitors must arrive 30 minutes prior to their scheduled visit time. Visitors may visit only one inmate per visit for a period of two (2) hours. The information provided in this document is believed to be accurate, though it remains subject to change without notice. This document was published February 2013. 6

Where do I park when I arrive at the facility?
There is ample visitor parking in the front parking lot of the facility. All vehicles must be completely secured while on Citrus County Detention Facility property.

Will I be searched?
All visitors and their possessions entering the Citrus County Detention Facility are subject to search. The visitor may be required to submit to an electronic or pat search before entry is permitted.

What is the dress code for visitation?
Visitors are required to wear long pants (or a dress/skirt/shorts of appropriate length), shirts, underclothes and shoes. No low cut blouses. All shirts/blouses must have sleeves. No jackets or sweaters may be used to cover a sleeveless shirt/blouse. Shorts/Skirts must reach at least to the top of the knee. No bathing suits, halter tops, tank tops, tube tops, muscle shirts or miniskirts are allowed. The Visitation Officer will determine if clothing is appropriate. What type of identification do I need to be allowed into the facility? Each visitor must produce a driver's license, state issued photo identification or passport upon entering the facility.

What items am I allowed to bring to visitation?
Cell phones, cameras, cigarettes, lighters, knives, guns, and handcuff keys, are not allowed to be brought into the facility. Only photo identification and car keys will be allowed into the visitation area. No purses, wallets, bags, brief cases, etc. will be allowed into the visitation area. We recommend leaving these items in your secured vehicle. The facility has storage space for umbrellas in case of inclement weather. For those unable to store their personal items in a secured vehicle, there are a limited number of lockers available in the lobby. Items not allowed in the facility will not be stored in these lockers. The facility is not responsible for items brought into the facility that are not allowed into the visitation area.

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Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

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