CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic

Private Facility

Last Updated: August 09, 2019
Address
6564 Hwy 96, Olney Springs, CO 81062
Beds
1794
County
Crowley
Security Level
MEDIUM - general
Phone
719-267-3548
Fax
719-267-4517
Facility Type
Adult
Satellite View of CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 719-267-3548

This facility is for adult inmates.

The inmates housed at CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic located at 6564 Hwy 96 in Olney Springs, CO are placed according to their custody level and are incarcerated by a private company contracted by a government agency and are paid a per diem or monthly rate, either for each inmate in the facility or for each bed available. The facility is well-trained and well-staffed. This doesn't come without some controversy as the "price of incarceration" is big business and critics claim there is a monetary benefit to keeping people locked up. The flip side is this facility undergoes rigorous inspections and are some of the be maintained in the US.

For inmates that show a willingness to learn new things, there are educational and vocational training programs here that will prepare them for a successful reentry when released.

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic - Visitation
CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic - Inmate Fact Sheet
CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic - Family Information

Customer base: Colorado Dept. of Corrections

Inmate Orientation
Within the first two weeks of arrival at a CoreCivic correctional facility, every inmate will attend the facility’s orientation program and receive a copy of the facility’s inmate handbook.
The inmate handbook includes all the information an inmate needs to start a productive life inside the facility and remain connected with family or lawyers.
A few handbook topics include:
• Requesting a medical appointment/available medical services
• Religious services
• Educational programs
• Recreation
• Commissary and creating an account
• Hygiene and grooming expectations
• Facility schedule
• Visitation information and schedule
Orientation and the inmate handbook ensure that inmates in our care can immediately address any concerns or questions and begin to participate in the programs and services offered at our facility.
Operations Concern Center
At all times, we remain committed to the fair and ethical treatment of those individuals entrusted to our care.
CoreCivic has in place clear and accessible processes for inmates and family members to make grievances known that include a dedicated telephone and email hotline. We investigate all allegations fully and cooperate and collaborate with other agencies and law enforcement, as needed.
Protecting Inmate and Detainee Rights
At CoreCivic, we take very seriously our responsibility to respect and uphold the rights and welfare of inmates and detainees in our care. Our employees learn about the company’s longstanding inmate and detainee rights policies in their initial, pre-service training and are refreshed on those commitments every year through in-service training. The information is clearly stated in CoreCivic’s employee handbook, and the policies are also shared with every inmate and detainee who enters one of our facilities. Equally as important, we fully comply with any and all inmate and detainee rights policies our government partners require.
Our dedicated employees – including chaplains, nurses, teachers and officers – are committed to ensuring that every individual in our CoreCivic facilities has:
Safety and Security
• Protection from personal abuse and injury, verbal abuse, corporal punishment, property damage and harassment. For example, CoreCivic has a robust sexual abuse prevention program in place
• Freedom from unreasonable searches.
• Protection from an inmate or detainee having power or authority over another.
• Separate housing for males and females when both sexes are housed in the same facility.

Inmate Wellness
Corrections provides inmates and detainees with the opportunity to pause and assess their lifestyles. For many, incarceration marks the first time in their adult lives when they will have seen a medical professional or received a regular and balanced diet. At CoreCivic, we are proud to offer life-changing services that will enable men and women to find healthy paths toward wellness. We do this through a wide array of options, including:

Nutrition Services
Mealtime is very important in our everyday lives. Food is known as such an important aspect of correctional operations that it is often directly tied to inmate behavior and morale. Not only do breakfast, lunch and dinner help provide daily structure and routines, they also have an impact on overall health and wellness.
Nutrition service is a vital aspect of CoreCivic operations. Guided by our individual government partners, CoreCivic takes great care to offers meals that support specialized diets and cultural preferences, while conforming to rigorous nutritional guidelines. Our team of culinary experts relies on a library of nearly 700 recipes to meet the dietary needs of those in our care. All meals provided at CoreCivic facilities are reviewed and approved by registered dietitians. On a daily basis, we provide meals that support religious diets and more than a dozen therapeutic diets. In fact, seven percent of those is our care receive specialized therapeutic diets that serve to support wellness for a wide array of medical conditions, including high blood pressure, diabetes, pregnancy, and autoimmune diseases.
For many, incarceration serves as a much-needed opportunity to receive consistent access to quality nutrition services. When people have access to sufficient food, they are able to make better choices, increase learning abilities, and combat various health issues. Through something as fundamental as food, we are able to help guide inmates down a path toward health and wellness, both while in our care and after their release.

Health Care
All too often, for many offenders, the first time they receive comprehensive health care is upon becoming incarcerated.
Upon intake at a CoreCivic facility, inmates are screened so that our medical professionals may manage existing concerns and address any new diagnoses. A typical CoreCivic facility has a medical unit where physicians, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and medical assistants can provide routine check-ups, manage sick calls and address non-emergency needs. Our correctional health care facilities typically include a dental clinic, too.
For offenders who experience mental health problems, from emotional conflict to mental illness, we have a team of qualified mental health professionals to assist them with their needs. Offenders are screened upon arrival at each facility, and if needed, they're referred to a psychologist, psychiatrist or mental health specialist for follow-up evaluation and intervention. We provide treatment in the form of medication, when needed, as well as group and individual counseling. All CoreCivic staff receive training in the identification of mental health crises, and they refer offenders to the professional staff whenever they suspect someone is experiencing a problem. We constantly monitor the offender population for signs of declining mental health and suicide risk, working actively to assist a troubled offender in his or her time of need.
CoreCivic adheres to standardized regulations and/or are certified by the American Correctional Association, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and/or the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. These organizations work to improve the quality of health care provided in jails and prisons by developing and maintaining nationally recognized standards for correctional health care.
Our correctional health care teams are supported by a regional network of medical professionals across the country and are led by a talented team at the company's headquarters. Additionally, CoreCivic facilities leverage medical technology to securely automate medical records, scheduling, medication administration, pill call and pharmacy services.

Wellness Activities
Recreational opportunities help provide relief and respite to those in our care. At CoreCivic facilities, recreational outlets are designed to help inmates stay active, get fit and interact with fellow offenders in positive, collaborative ways. Sports like basketball, activities like board games and hobbies like creative writing or knitting help inmates tap into their creativity while learning valuable lessons in teamwork, communication and mutual respect.
Within CoreCivic correctional facilities, recreational activities are managed and overseen by CoreCivic professionals, not limited to but including chaplains, unit managers, recreational supervisors and others. Our devoted and trained volunteers also contribute valuable recreational programs like crafts, reading groups and other enjoyable pastimes to offenders in our correctional centers.

Staying in Touch
Staying in touch with an inmate can be challenging due to time limitations, especially when your loved one is located a considerable distance away.
Sometimes frequent visitation simply isn’t possible. Even so, staying in touch can make all the difference.
We believe that maintaining connections with friends and family makes a positive impact on the inmates in our care – behaviorally, emotionally and academically – and increases their success rate upon release. Success stories make our day.
• We invite you to visit.
• We invite you to write and call.
• We invite you to be involved and connected.
• Telephone Calls and Phone Cards
• Hearing the sounds of a familiar voice can lift an inmate’s spirits. Typically, our correctional facilities allow inmates to make collect calls.
• Each facility has a bank of phones that are provided for inmate calls. Inmates may use these phones to make collect calls or use their pre-paid calling card.
• Detailed information on how your loved one can apply money to their calling card is provided in the inmate handbook and will vary by facility.
Mail
Written mail through the U.S. Postal Service is perhaps one of the easiest ways for friends and family to stay in touch with their loved one. Every facility provides mail service for the inmate population.
Guidelines for addressing mail correctly can be found on the webpage for each specific facility.
While standard letters and cards are generally acceptable at every facility, all other allowable mail will vary from facility to facility.
The majority of our facilities will not allow packages (anything larger than a standard letter or card) from friends and family into the facility. Unapproved mail may result in an expense to the inmate if the item has to be shipped back, destroyed or donated.
Some facilities will allow friends and family members to purchase items from an approved vendor (such as Amazon). The package can be mailed directly from the approved vendor to the facility.
Email access is not available at this time.

Inmate Accounts and Commissary
Inmates may need or receive money for various facility life activities, such as a calling card, medical co-pays, items from commissary, or even a paying job. Inmate money is managed through inmate accounts.
Generally, all our facilities have a commissary, which is an in-facility storehouse where food items, hygiene items and writing materials can be purchased. This is in addition to the meals and standard-issue clothing and hygiene products already supplied by and paid for by the facility. Inmates use the money in their inmate account to purchase these items.
Typically, friends and family may contribute money to an inmate’s account. Many of the facility profiles have instructions for contributing to an inmate account.

Inmate Mailing Procedures
The United States Postal Services (USPS) prohibits the mailing of any of the following:
• Potentially hazardous materials that are not properly marked and packaged;
• Perishable items that are not properly marked and packaged;
• Correspondence containing any vile, or obscene material, and matter inciting violence or terrorism;
• Solicitations that mimic billing statements, unless accompanied by a prominent disclaimer;
• Solicitations stating approval by the USPS or Postmaster General, or conformance to any postal law or regulation; and
• Correspondence that bears deliberate imitations of postal markings and/or postal trademarks (e.g. “Priority Mail”, etc.). Correspondents are personally responsible for the content of each item of correspondence they send through the USPS. Any violation of laws governing correspondence will be referred to postal authorities and to appropriate criminal authorities. The sender may be subject to civil or criminal penalties and/or federal prosecution for violation of postal laws.

Prohibited Correspondence:
Correspondence containing malicious, false, inflammatory, or other types of statements or information, the purpose of which is reasonably intended to harm, or intimidate an employee, visitor, or guest may be prohibited. Correspondence that could reasonably jeopardize legitimate penalogical interests includes, but is not limited to:

• Plans to escape;
• Plans for criminal activities;
• Plans to introduce contraband into or out of the facility;
• Plans for activities in violation of facility rules;
• Threats to the safety and security of facility order, discipline or rehabilitation;
• Information which, if communicated, would create a clear and present danger of violence and physical harm to a human being (including racially inflammatory material);
• Letters or materials written in code or a foreign language when the inmate/resident understands English (unless the Warden/Administrator or designee determined that the recipient does not read and write fluently in English);
• Correspondence which attempts to forward unauthorized correspondence to a third party;
• Obscene material;
• Correspondence which encourages deviate sexual behavior which is criminal, in violation of facility rules, detrimental to the rehabilitation of inmates/residents, or determined by the Warden/Administrator or designee to be detrimental to the safety and security of the facility (these materials include, but are not limited to, pictures, drawings, or photographs which display or suggest vaginal, rectal, or oral penetration by a person or object, ejaculation, bestiality, sadistic or masochistic behaviors, child pornography, or the suggestion of child pornography);
• Correspondence which may enable one (1) or more inmates/residents to ascertain the time(s), date(s), and/or location(s) of upcoming off-site appointments or transports;
• Personal identifying information (e.g. birth certificate, social security number, driver’s license number, etc.) of individuals other than the inmate/resident’s and his/her immediate family; and
• Other general correspondence for which rejection is reasonably related to a legitimate penalogical interest. Prohibited Items: Items normally contained in general correspondence that are considered to be prohibited include, but are not limited to:
• Maps of the city where the facility is located or surrounding communities;
• Polaroid photographs;
• Photo negatives/slides;
• Photo albums;
• Photos of current or former employees;
• Framed photos;
• Greeting cards larger than 8 X 10;
• Greeting cards containing electronic or other non-paper parts;
• Greeting cards constructed in such a way to permit concealment of contraband;
• Stick on labels or stamps that appear to contain contraband;
• Items that are glued, taped, stapled, or otherwise affixed to a page; and
• Any items prohibited by law, regulations, or contract.

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Inmate Locator

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Colorado. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

Visitation Information

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic - Visitation

1. Scheduled Visitation will be available on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday each week from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

  • Note: There will be no visits on the 3rd Monday of every month due to the Parole Board at the facility.
  • Individual scheduled visits will be made on a "First Come, First Served" basis. Once each scheduled visit day is filled to the 45 available slots, no other visits for that day will be scheduled.
  • All visits will be scheduled no later than 3:30 p.m. on the Thursday of the week prior to the desired visiting date.

2. Only visitors can schedule a visit. They must use the below process:

  • All visits will be scheduled no later than 4:00 p.m. on the Thursday of the week prior to the desired visiting date. (Example: Thursday September 29th, 2016 by 4:00 p.m. for desired visits during the visiting week starting on Thursday October 6, 2016).
  • Visitors will only be allowed to schedule a visit up to 30 days in advance.
  • Below are the 3 available methods that may be used to schedule a visit:
    • Call 719-267-3548 ext. 23898 - Thursday through Monday - 8:30 a.m. until 3:30 p.m.
    • Email the request to CrowleyVisitation@cca.com (include: visitors names, offender name and CDOC#, date of visit requested) a verification email will be returned to the sender's email confirming the visit.
    • In person at the Visitation Lobby Desk on visiting days during visiting hours only.

3. Special visits will still be available as before to those who meet the requirements as ourlined in the CDOC Administrative Regulation 300-01.

4. Visitors will be allowed to enter the facility for processing at 8:15 a.m. on the day of their scheduled visit.

5. Visitors must arrive to the facility no later than 9:45 a.m. This allows for processing through security and for the staff to call the offender over to visitation. Visitation processing will re-open at 11:00 a.m. Exceptions will be made in extenuating circumstances (adverse weather conditions, traffic, etc.)

6. Visitors may cancel their visits by calling 719-267-3548 ext. 23898 any day of the week, prior to the scheduled visit day. Offenders may also cancel any visit by sending an offender request to the visitation department, requesting the visit be canceled.

Visiting Application must be mailed to:
Attention: Private Prison Monitoring Unit
Colorado Department of Corrections Headquarters
1250 Academy Park Loop
Colorado Springs, CO 80910

Questions regarding visitation rules and scheduling a visit: 719-267-3548 ext. 23898 (CCCF)

ATTENTION: PAROLE BOARD VISITORS

All inmates who are expecting to have family and friends present at parole board hearings will need to submit the names to their case manager two weeks in advance of their expected parole hearing date. If these visitors are not already cleared and on an active visiting list, they will need to have cearance done by CDOC. In this case, the case manager will need to be given the full name, date of birth and drivers license number so that an accurate background check can be completed by CDOC. If family/visitors show up who have not been cleared and approved, then those people will have to wait until CDOC can do an NCIC/CCIC clearance on them. When cleared, they can be allowed to enter the facility.

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic - Visitation Frequently Asked Questions

Who can visit?
Anyone, who has been cleared through PPMU (Private Prison Monitoring Unit), who is not a victim or has a felony or is on probation or parole and three years have not passed.

How do I get approved for visitation?
The visitation applications are on the Colorado Department of Corrections website http://www.doc.state.co.us/. You will need to fill these out and send them to PPMU (Private Prison Monitoring Unit) at 1250 Academy Park Loop, Colorado Springs, CO 80910. You will need to send photo identification with these.

How do minors get approved to visit?
The parent of the minor child shall include them on their visitation application. When visitation has been approved they will need to bring the child's birth certificate. If someone other than the parent listed on the birth certificate is bringing the child they will need the birth certificate and a notarized affidavit from the parent listed on the birth certificate with them.

How long does the application process take?
3-4 weeks if the application is mailed directly to Colorado Springs, CO. If it is mailed to the inmate or visitation here at CCCF it will take longer.

How will I know if I've been approved?
The information is sent to the inmate along with the dress code upon approval. He can either mail the information to the visitor to let them know, or when and if he makes a phone call to them.

What are the days and times of visitation?
Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm.

How long can I visit?
If there are not very many people visiting you can stay the entire time from 9-3. If it becomes crowded with a lot of people wanting to visit then first in will be first out and you will have 2 hours.

Where do I park when I arrive at the facility?
In the parking lot in front of the facility

Will I be searched?
Yes, and you will need to sign a consent to search form.

What is the dress code for visitation?
All visitors, including attorneys and official visitors, must be fully dressed in appropriate, conventional, relaxed-fit clothing which is not unduly provocative, suggestive, or revealing and does not resemble offender attire or present adornments which could be used as a weapon. Other visitor clothing standards include:
1. Trousers, pants, slacks, jeans, skirts, etc., will be worn in the manner intended (no sagging).
2. Shoes are required, no open toe shoes, sandals, or heels that are higher than 2 inches.
3. Clothing worn to excessively accent the body or too tightly, will be considered inappropriate.
4. Clothing made of sheer, transparent, net, mesh or any see through materials are not allowed. (This includes jeans that are torn or ripped showing bare skin or leggings).
5. Appropriate undergarments are required, but should not be visible.
6. No camouflage, solid green, orange clothing or gray sweat suits.
7. Dresses, skirts, jumpers, culottes, shorts shall not be worn if more than four inches above the kneecap while sitting. Slit dresses/skirts shall be allowed only if the slit is not more than four inches above the kneecap while standing. Wrap-around clothing will not be allowed.
8. The only jewelry or adornment visitors will be permitted to wear into the visiting area is a wedding ring, one religious necklace pendant and medical alert badges or bracelets. No body piercing of any type.
9. Visitors are not to wear hats or hoods into the visiting area, (except for religious hats or headgear); gloves, scarves or out garments, such as topcoats, raincoats, jackets, and similar attire will not be permitted within the visiting area.
10. Hair extensions which are woven, sewn, or glued to the natural hair, and wigs which have been disclosed in advance, will be permitted but are subject to search. Hair extensions which are attached to the hair with a clip or comb will not be allowed.
11. Visitors are not to wear any garments which unduly expose the shoulder, chest, back, stomach, midriff, and/or underarms. Necklines must be within two (2) inches of the base of the neck.
12. No controversial/objectionably gang, obscene, drug and alcohol designs, messages or profanity on clothing.
There will be NO exceptions to the above dress code policy. Anyone who does not follow the dress code will not be admitted to visitation.

What type of identification do I need to be allowed into the facility?
You will need a government issued photo ID.

What items am I allowed to bring to visitation?
A religious medallion, a medical alert badge or bracelet, wedding ring set, and enough cash for the canteen card to purchase out of the vending machine and your ID.

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Facility Type

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic is detention facility owned by private prison company to handle the intake, and housing of offenders for the Crowley County Sheriff, the State of Colorado, Bureau of Prisons, the US Marshal Service and Immigration (ICE). This regional operation is structured to implement superior quality controls to the standards set by the jurisdiction whose inmates are being held. The correctional facility offers a full complement of high-quality services, including secure custody services, academic and vocational programming, secure transportation service, correctional health, and mental health care.

The main benefit of the contracting of prisons to private operators is that it can save money. The end goal is to house prisoners in an attempt to rehabilitate them or remove them from the streets. The corporation's end goal is to profit from anything they deal in. In order to make money as a private prison, they receive a stipend from the government.

Custody/Security Level

CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic is a medium security facility located at 6564 Hwy 96 in Olney Springs, CO. Medium custody inmates live in either one or two-man units within specific pods. Medium security prisons are the standard facilities used to house most criminals. They feature cage-style housing, armed guards, and a much more regimented daily routine than a minimum or low-security prisons. These are more serious offenders which must be supervised 24/7 with controlled movements. The prison yard has strengthened perimeter fence, rows of triple razor wire on double fencing and electronic detection systems to ensure inmates stay within the confined areas within the facility.

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How To Send Things

There are strict procedures for everything related to "sending things to an inmate" in a Medium - general facility. This includes sending money for commissary packages, sending mail like letters with photos, magazine subscriptions, buying phone time, postcards and greeting cards, and even distance learning courses (get your degree, you've got a lot of extra time). You also need to know about visitation, what are the hours and rules.

All of the information you could ever need to know is below, patiently scroll the page and get as much information about CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic that you'd ever want to know. If there is anything that you were looking for, but don't see, please email us at aid@inmateaid.com.

How To Send Money:

How to Send an Inmate Money in Colorado

Here are some general guidelines for sending money to an inmate's trust account; but not specific to a particular facility, institution or jail. Inmates need money to access several privileges like weekly shopping at the commissary, making phone calls, using the email service where offered, using the electronic tablets where offered and paying their co-pay when needing the medical or dental services. Some county jails require a per-night fee for the jail’s expenses.

What is a Commissary?

A commissary is a store within the jail. Commissary day is usually held once a week and can only be used if the inmate has funds in their commissary account, like a bank account within the institution. If the inmate has a job, their paycheck is deposited into this account, too.

The Commissary sells various products that the inmates may purchase if they have money on their books. Items sold are clothing, shoes, snacks and food, as well as hygienic products like soap, shampoo, and shavers. The commissary also sells products like books, magazines, televisions, radios, playing cards, headphones, MP3 players, electronic tablets, songs and educational programming. They also sell paper, envelopes, and stamps allowing the inmate to write their loved ones, friends and family. Facilities will provide stamps and paper to inmates who are indigent – eligible where no money has been in their commissary account for at least 30 days.

How you send money to an inmate?

Sending money to an inmate varies from state to state, depending if it is county, state or federal, their ways of accepting money for inmates’ changes by the money transfer company they’ve contracted with. Federal Prisons and some state-level prisons have centralized banking systems which means that you do not need to know where they are specifically, just that they are in the state systems of for instance the California, Texas, Florida DOC or the FBOP to name a few.

How do I send money using MoneyGram?

Some facilities will allow you to deposit cash through the lobby window stand-alone kiosk in the lobby or visitation room. Most facilities will also accept a postal money order mailed to the institution’s inmate mailing address made payable to the full inmate’s name.

Electronic banking allows friends and family members to send the funds online, and correctional departments are starting to favor this method because it is less work for staff and more accurate/easier to keep track of, as well as being more convenient.

Regardless of the method of sending funds, there are several key things you will need to know:
• Inmate’s full committed name
• Inmate’s ID number
• Inmate’s location – or a system like the federal BOP

Before sending any funds you should find out what online transfer companies the institution your inmate is incarcerated in uses. You can find this information on our site by navigating to the facilities page click on the Money Transfer button under the address and phone number.

Pay close attention to the rules of the facility. Sometimes they will require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time, but in federal, there is no limit.

MoneyGram, JPay, OffenderConnect, AccessCorrections, JailATM, WU, Touchpayonline, tigercommissary, smartdeposit are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities. MoneyGram is by far the oldest and most trusted.

Who else can access the money you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution will be subject to commissary/trust account garnishment. If the inmate has these financial obligations, they will be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It may be a percentage or the entire amount depending on the situation. We recommend inmates who are going into their bid contact the counselor and make an arrangement beforehand. If you go in knowing they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is better than have them take it all and you find out in the commissary line when the account is zero.

Why is my inmate asking for more than I normally send?

This is generally a signal that the inmate is doing something they shouldn’t and need money to get them out of or through a situation. It could be gambling, it could be extortion it could be other things you don’t need to know on this forum (for now). Set boundaries with your inmate. Tell them that “this is the amount I can send each month” and that is it. There are no extras beyond the boundary. Also, NEVER send money to the account of another inmate on your inmate’s instruction. This is a sign that something is not right. If the corrections people discover this, and they do more times than not, it will result in some severe disciplinary action to the inmate, and certainly the loss of all privileges.

Who can I call if I suspect something?

We recommend speaking with the counselor or case manager of the facility and use a generic reference in the event that your suspicions are wrong. You needn’t put them in a more difficult position if they are.

Inmate Care Packages:

How to Buy Inmate Commissary Care Packages Online

Show your loved one how much you care – order a package today! The facilities usually have a weekly limit of about $100 per inmate, plus processing and tax. The orders do NOT count towards the inmates weekly commissary allowances Deposits can be made online for inmates 24/7 using a credit/debit card

There are also a few services that allow you how to order inmate commissary online. These trusted providers are approved and share revenue with the prisons from the sales to the inmates.

Here is a list of other similar programs prison commissary: Keefe Group, Access Securpak, iCareGifts, Union Supply Direct, Walkenhorst's, CareACell

Inmate Commissary:

What is Inmate Commissary?

Prison commissary (also sometimes referred to as inmate canteen) is a store for inmates housed within a correctional facility. While the very most basics may be provided for by a given correctional department, there are also other important goods/services that Florida prisoners and inmates must buy. For instance, supplies such as supplementary food, female hygiene products, books, writing utensils and a plethora of other things are examples of things that can be purchased as part of an inmate commissary packages for goods.

What is an Inmate trust account?

When you add money to an inmate account, the prison funds are stored on an inmate trust fund. This prison account basically acts as a personal bank account of an inmate. They will use this account to make Inmate Calls, pay for postage to Send Photos from Inmates, send emails from inmates, purchase Items from Commissary, receive wages from jobs, and more.

How To Send Mail:

This is how to send your inmate at CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic letters, photos, postcards, greeting cards and magazines

Incoming and outgoing inmate mail is subject to inspection for the presence of contraband that might threaten the safety, security or well-being of the jail/facility, its staff, and residents. Inmates may receive only metered, unstamped, plain white postcards no larger than 4" x 6" as mail. Writing must be in pencil or blue or black ink. Any other mail will be returned to the sender. If no return address is available, unauthorized mail will be stored in the inmate's locker until the inmate's release.

Inmate mail cannot contain any of the following: Create an immediate threat to jail order by describing the manufacture of weapons, bombs, incendiary devices, or tools for escape that realistically are a danger to jail security; Advocate violence, racial supremacy or ethnic purity; No current inmate-to-inmate mail will be allowed and will be destroyed.

The easiest workaround is to look over the mailing services of InmateAid. We have an automated system for sending your loved one that special message or picture. We send thousands of pieces of mail per month with NO issues with the prisons or jails. The envelopes display the InmateAid logo, the mail room knows for certain that the contents will not be compromising. This trust was established in 2012.

How To Send Greeting Cards and Postcards:

Greeting cards are great for the holidays and birthdays. The ones from the store often have more than just the message because the policies surrounding appropriate content (no nudity or sexually suggestive material no matter how funny), and they cannot have glitter, stickers or anything else that makes the card different from a normal plain old card. Instead of going to the Hallmark store in the mall and looking around for hours - go to our easy to search Greeting Cards service.

It takes literally 45 seconds and it's very affordable for what you're getting (and what they are getting, too!). Select from 100s of birthday, anniversary and every holiday you can think of, and VERY easy to send from your phone on InmateAid:

Don't forget Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, New Year's, Ramadan, Hanukkah, Passover, Easter, Kwanzaa or Valentine's Day!

In less than a minute and only $0.99, this act of kindness will be worth a million to your inmate. If you have a picture or two and don't want to write a long letter. Type out a little love in the message box and send your latest selfie... only 99 cents!

Don't wait until the moment has passed, it's easy and convenient to let them know you're thinking of them at every moment.

How To Send magazines and Books:

Send magazines to CO DOC - Crowley County Correctional Facility (CCCF) - CoreCivic at 6564 Hwy 96, Olney Springs, CO

Send the best magazines and books to your Inmate in jail or prison, it's the gift that keeps on giving all year round, There is nothing more exciting to an inmate (besides their release date) than getting their favorite magazine every month at mail call.

Magazines and books must come directly from the publisher. You are not allowed to send single magazines in an envelope. They need to come directly from the publisher with your inmate's name affixed to the address label. Magazine subscriptions are easy to set up, it takes literally 2 minutes.

You know when you go into the grocery and browse the new magazines on display? You see hundreds. Inside they place a little card that if you fill it out and send it in with your inmate's name, ID number and facility address - you drop it in the mail and in 8-12 weeks your inmate gets an issue every month for a whole year. Thankfully, there is an easier way, just CLICK here and browse yourself. Select a title or two and add your inmate's name to the order. It's fast, it's reliable and it's at a discounted rate for your convenience.

How To Save Money on Inmate Calls

The prison phone companies have a monopoly at the facility they have a contract with. Profits are shared so there is no incentive for their representatives to show you how to save money. They post their rates and in almost every case, there are at least two pricing tiers. Depending on where you are and where your inmate is, the type of phone number you use will make all the difference.

In federal prison, the answer is simply that a new local number will change your inmate's call rate from $.21 per minute to only $.06 per minute. Fed gives you only 300 minutes per month, the local line service is only $8.95, no hidden fees or bundling of other unwanted service charges

For the other facilities that are not federal, it used to be that a local number was the answer. Now, its market intelligence and InmateAid has made it their business to know what the best deal is in every scenario. And we can tell you that in 30% of the cases, we cannot save you a penny - and neither can anyone else. But we will give you a refund if we can't save you money.

For more specific information on inmate calls, you will want to navigate to the facility your inmate is incarcerated in through our site by going to Prison Directory and following the links to the Discount Telephone Service - get an honest estimate before you buy.

Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

Great Deals For You and Your Inmate