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Eden Detention Center - CoreCivic

Private Facility

Last Updated: September 27, 2022
Address
702 E Broadway St, Eden, TX 76837-0605
Beds
1504
County
Concho
Phone
325-869-2704
Fax
325-869-5147
Email
lee.mcdaniel@cca.com
Mailing Address
PO Box 605, Eden, TX 76837

Eden Detention Center is for Private Facility offenders sentenced up to twelve months.

All prisons and jails have Security or Custody levels depending on the inmate’s classification, sentence, and criminal history. Please review the rules and regulations for Medium - general facility.

The phone carrier is Trulincs, to see their rates and best-calling plans for your inmate to call you.

If you are unsure of your inmate's location, you can search and locate your inmate by typing in their last name, first name or first initial, and/or the offender ID number to get their accurate information immediately Registered Offenders

Satellite View of Eden Detention Center - CoreCivic

Eden Detention Center - CoreCivic basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 325-869-2704

The inmates housed at Eden Detention Center - CoreCivic located at 702 E Broadway St in Eden, TX are placed according to their custody level and are incarcerated by a private company contracted by a government agency and are paid a per diem or monthly rate, either for each inmate in the facility or for each bed available. The facility is well-trained and well-staffed. This doesn't come without some controversy as the "price of incarceration" is big business and critics claim there is a monetary benefit to keeping people locked up. The flip side is this facility undergoes rigorous inspections and are some of the be maintained in the US.

For inmates that show a willingness to learn new things, there are educational and vocational training programs here that will prepare them for a successful reentry when released.

Eden Detention Center is a privately owned and operated prison by CoreCivic for adult men located in Concho County, Texas. The low-security facility opened in 1985 under a contract with the Federal Bureau of Prisons (FBOP). In August 2016, Department of Justice officials announced that the FBOP would be phasing out its use of contracted facilities, on the grounds that private prisons provided less safe and less effective services with no substantial cost savings. The agency expects to allow current contracts on its thirteen remaining private facilities to expire.

The facility closed in 2017 when the contract with the FBOP ended. The facility reopened in 2019 under a new contract with the United States Marshals Service for 844 beds and the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement for 660 beds.

Eden Detention Center, located in the geographical center of the state, began operation under an intergovernmental agreement between the City of Eden and the Federal Bureau of Prisons in 1985.

Inmate Orientation - Within the first two weeks of arrival at a CoreCivic correctional facility, every inmate will attend the facility’s orientation program and receive a copy of the facility’s inmate handbook.
The inmate handbook includes all the information an inmate needs to start a productive life inside the facility and remain connected with family or lawyers.
A few handbook topics include:
• Requesting a medical appointment/available medical services
• Religious services
• Educational programs
• Recreation
• Commissary and creating an account
• Hygiene and grooming expectations
• Facility schedule
• Visitation information and schedule
Orientation and the inmate handbook ensure that inmates in our care can immediately address any concerns or questions and begin to participate in the programs and services offered at our facility.
Protecting Inmate and Detainee Rights
CoreCivic takes very seriously their responsibility to respect and uphold the rights and welfare of inmates and detainees in our care. Our employees learn about the company’s longstanding inmate and detainee rights policies in their initial, pre-service training and are refreshed on those commitments every year through in-service training.
Safety and Security
• Protection from personal abuse and injury, verbal abuse, corporal punishment, property damage and harassment. For example, CoreCivic has a robust sexual abuse prevention program in place
• Freedom from unreasonable searches.
• Protection from an inmate or detainee having power or authority over another.
• Separate housing for males and females when both sexes are housed in the same facility.

Inmate Wellness - Corrections provides inmates and detainees with the opportunity to pause and assess their lifestyles. For many, incarceration marks the first time in their adult lives when they will have seen a medical professional or received a regular and balanced diet.

Nutrition Services - Mealtime is very important in our everyday lives. Food is known as such an important aspect of correctional operations that it is often directly tied to inmate behavior and morale. Not only do breakfast, lunch and dinner help provide daily structure and routines, they also have an impact on overall health and wellness.
For many, incarceration serves as a much-needed opportunity to receive consistent access to quality nutrition services. When people have access to sufficient food, they are able to make better choices, increase learning abilities, and combat various health issues. Through something as fundamental as food, we are able to help guide inmates down a path toward health and wellness, both while in our care and after their release.

Inmate Accounts and Commissary - Inmates may need or receive money for various facility life activities, such as a calling card, medical co-pays, items from the commissary, or even a paying job. Inmate money is managed through inmate accounts.
Generally, all our facilities have a commissary, which is an in-facility storehouse where food items, hygiene items and writing materials can be purchased. This is in addition to the meals and standard-issue clothing and hygiene products already supplied by and paid for by the facility. Inmates use the money in their inmate account to purchase these items.
Typically, friends and family may contribute money to an inmate’s account. Many of the facility profiles have instructions for contributing to an inmate account.

Inmate Mailing Procedures
The United States Postal Services (USPS) prohibits the mailing of any of the following:
• Potentially hazardous materials that are not properly marked and packaged;
• Perishable items that are not properly marked and packaged;
• Correspondence containing any vile, or obscene material, and matter inciting violence or terrorism;
• Solicitations that mimic billing statements, unless accompanied by a prominent disclaimer;
• Solicitations stating approval by the USPS or Postmaster General, or conformance to any postal law or regulation; and
• Correspondence that bears deliberate imitations of postal markings and/or postal trademarks (e.g. “Priority Mail”, etc.). Correspondents are personally responsible for the content of each item of correspondence they send through the USPS. Any violation of laws governing correspondence will be referred to postal authorities and to appropriate criminal authorities. The sender may be subject to civil or criminal penalties and/or federal prosecution for violation of postal laws.

Prohibited Correspondence - Correspondence containing malicious, false, inflammatory, or other types of statements or information, the purpose of which is reasonably intended to harm, or intimidate an employee, visitor, or guest may be prohibited. Correspondence that could reasonably jeopardize legitimate penalogical interests includes, but is not limited to:

• Plans to escape;
• Plans for criminal activities;
• Plans to introduce contraband into or out of the facility;
• Plans for activities in violation of facility rules;
• Threats to the safety and security of facility order, discipline or rehabilitation;
• The information which, if communicated, would create a clear and present danger of violence and physical harm to a human being (including racially inflammatory material);
• Letters or materials written in code or a foreign language when the inmate/resident understands English (unless the Warden/Administrator or designee determined that the recipient does not read and write fluently in English);
• The correspondence which attempts to forward unauthorized correspondence to a third party;
• Obscene material;
• Correspondence which encourages deviant sexual behavior which is criminal, in violation of facility rules, detrimental to the rehabilitation of inmates/residents, or determined by the Warden/Administrator or designee to be detrimental to the safety and security of the facility (these materials include, but are not limited to, pictures, drawings, or photographs which display or suggest vaginal, rectal, or oral penetration by a person or object, ejaculation, bestiality, sadistic or masochistic behaviors, child pornography, or the suggestion of child pornography);
• The correspondence which may enable one (1) or more inmates/residents to ascertain the time(s), date(s), and/or location(s) of upcoming off-site appointments or transports;
• Personal identifying information (e.g. birth certificate, social security number, driver’s license number, etc.) of individuals other than the inmate/resident’s and his/her immediate family; and
• Other general correspondence for which rejection is reasonably related to a legitimate penalogical interest. Prohibited Items: Items normally contained in general correspondence that are considered to be prohibited include, but are not limited to:
• Maps of the city where the facility is located or surrounding communities;
• Polaroid photographs;
• Photo negatives/slides;
• Photo albums;
• Photos of current or former employees;
• Framed photos;
• Greeting cards larger than 8 X 10;
• Greeting cards containing electronic or other non-paper parts;
• Greeting cards constructed in such a way to permit concealment of contraband;
• Stick on labels or stamps that appear to contain contraband;
• Items that are glued, taped, stapled, or otherwise affixed to a page; and
• Any items prohibited by law, regulations, or contract.

Inmate Locator

Eden Detention Center - CoreCivic publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Texas. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

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Visitation Information

Eden Detention Center - Visitation

Visiting a correctional facility can feel intimidating, especially for the first-time visitor. We have our own specific processes and rules, strict security measures, uniformed staff and words and terminology you may not be familiar with. Ultimately, those security features are in place to protect you and your loved one although we understand the potential for concern or confusion.
Our goal is for visitors to be comfortable, even impressed, by our facility environment during your visit. We simply ask that you help us maintain safety and security by following our important guidelines.
Contraband and Personal Items - When entering one of our facilities, typically, visitors are only permitted to bring in an ID and a small amount of cash ($10 or less) or a vending card for use at the facility’s vending machines during visitation. Please check with the facility prior to visitation for specific information on the use of vending cards or cash.
Proper identification must be a valid driver’s license or a government-issued ID. Some facilities require a birth certificate to be presented for children attending visitation, so check the requirement of the specific facility you are visiting.
For security reasons, visitors will not be allowed to take any personal items or gifts into the facility – including cell phones, wallets, purses, food, gifts, magazines or books.
Attempting to pass any of these unapproved items through security, even if accidentally, is illegal. Please leave all personal items in your vehicle. Some facilities offer lockers in the facility lobby for storing these items.
Additionally, attempting to introduce illegal contraband, such as cigarettes, drugs and alcohol, weapons and cell phones, to a facility inmate is considered a security threat and will result in immediate legal action.
While we understand that some of these rules may be inconvenient or difficult for our visitors, it is our responsibility to keep all of our inmates, staff and visitors safe. These strict safety procedures are very important and are just one of the many ways we maintain a safe and secure environment.
Visitation and Inmate Contact - There are different types of visitation, depending on the facility and the inmate’s classification – contact visitation, noncontact visitation and, occasionally, video visitation.
Most of our facilities have both contact and non-contact visitation. Appropriate contact with your loved one – such as hugging – varies. Our staff will help you understand the appropriate contact rules for your time with your loved one.
Typically contact visitation will be held in a large room with tables. Some facilities have a designated visitation room. Others may use educational rooms for visitation.
Noncontact visitation includes the use of individual booths with telephones for speaking with inmates.
Video Visitation - A small number of CoreCivic correctional facilities provide video visitation. Video visitation is especially useful for those inmates incarcerated in another state.
To participate in a video visitation session, the inmate must schedule a specific visitation time. CoreCivic will partner with a local church or other organization to provide the video visitation equipment and session for the visitor.
For specific information on video visitation, please contact the facility directly.
Preparing for Visitation

Visitation List and Approval - During the inmate orientation process, inmates will mail a visitation application form to the friends and family members who want to visit. It is the inmate’s responsibility to mail the applications. Individuals who receive the application must complete the form and mail it back to the specific CoreCivic facility to initiate the approval process. All facility visitors must be approved through a background check prior to visiting an inmate.
Once the background checks are completed, the inmate is responsible for informing friends and family members that they are approved for visitation.
Passing Security - Every visitor who enters our correctional facilities must pass through our security measures before proceeding to a visitation area.
Visitors will be screened through a metal detector, much like what you would experience in an airport. However, our metal detector settings are much more sensitive than typical metal detectors. When preparing for your visit, please be sure to consider any metal on your clothing, including underwear and shoes.
Visitation Dress Code - Understandably, many of our visitors do not realize that what they are wearing can impact their ability to visit with their loved one.
Every facility has a strict dress code for visitors, and each facility’s dress code may vary, sometimes depending on the specific requirements of our government partner. Please review the specific dress code requirements for the facility you are visiting prior to your visit.
A few general guidelines that apply at every facility include:

  • Skirts and shorts must be knee-length or longer.
  • Only closed-toe shoes are permitted. No sandals or flip-flops.
  • No revealing or low cut shirts. No tank tops or halter tops.
  • No see-though or extremely tight clothing.
  • No strapless dresses. No swimsuits.
  • No gang or obscene messages or designs.
  • No hats or hoodies on shirts
  • No sunglasses or excessive jewelry.
  • Underwear must be worn at all times, but not visible.
  • Everyone must clear the metal detector.

Visiting from Out of State - If you must travel a great distance to visit your loved one, you want your limited visitation time to go smoothly. To help ensure you are prepared, we’ve assembled our most important advice for a successful visit.
Inmate Visitation Checklist
Before arriving at a correctional facility, think through the following checklist to ensure that you are prepared for visitation.
___ I am on my inmate’s approved visitation list.
___ I have returned my paperwork and passed the visitation background check.
___ I have my driver’s license or government ID.
___ I have planned my visit during the facility’s visitation hours.
___ I have packed facility dress code approved clothes and shoes.
___ I will clear the metal detector.
___ I have ensured that my car, purse and pockets are clear of any inappropriate items before entering the facility grounds.
___ I have checked to see if there are special visitation requirements, such as a scheduled appointment.

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Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

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