Leon County FL Jail

County Jail

Last Updated: January 09, 2020
Address
535 Appleyard Drive PO Box 2278, Tallahassee, FL 32316
Beds
1000
County
Leon
Security Level
County - medium
Phone
850-922-3500
Fax
850-921-3697
Email
lcsocpu@leoncountyfl.gov
Mailing Address
PO Box 2278 , Tallahassee, FL 32316 
Facility Type
Adult
Satellite View of Leon County FL Jail

Leon County FL Jail basic information to help guide you through what you can do for your inmate while they are incarcerated. The facility's direct contact number: 850-922-3500

This facility is for adult inmates.

The Leon County FL Jail is a medium-security detention center located at 535 Appleyard Drive
PO Box 2278 Tallahassee, FL which is operated locally by the Leon County Sheriff's Office and holds inmates awaiting trial or sentencing or both. Most of the sentenced inmates are here for less than two years. Leon County accepts inmates from surrounding towns, municipalities, the US Marshal's Service and the Tallahassee Police Department who do not have their own long-term lock-up.

Leon County Detention Center - Inmate Handbook

The Leon County Detention Center houses pre-trial, pre-sentenced, county and state sentenced males and females, as well as juvenile offenders who have been adjudicated as adults. Our goal is to provide a safe, secure, functional and humane environment for staff and inmates, while protecting our community.

The Leon County Detention Center is a direct supervision facility based on the unit management concept. Most programs, services and activities are decentralized to the housing units. These units are attached to a central core which contains administrative areas, program services, a medical unit, support services and booking and release.

This facility opened its doors August of 1993 with an inmate population of approximately 600 inmates and was staffed at 274 positions. This facility currently houses over 1,000 inmates and staffs approximately 300 positions.

Direct supervision has allowed our staff to have more control of the inmates, and because the services and programs are delivered to the housing units, there is less inmate movement and better security.

Inmate Property and Communication

Inmate Mail

All incoming mail will be inspected for contraband. The following items will be returned to sender:

  • Stained with powder, perfume, glue or glitter
  • Envelopes with tape or stickers
  • Mail from other Detention Centers or Prison Institutions, unless approved by both Institutions
  • Note pads
  • Greeting cards larger than 5" by 7"
  • Paper, envelopes, pencils, pens or stamps
  • Music lyrics
  • Cell phones

Inmate Mail Censorship

Inmate mail shall not be censored and/or denied unless for legitimate facility interests for order and security, and in the interest of upholding the law. Such interests include, but are not limited to, the following statements, threats and/or plans of:

  • Physical harm or threats of physical harm against persons inside or outside the facility;
  • Extortion, blackmail or other criminal activity;
  • Escape;
  • Activities in violation of facility rules;
  • Whose nature is such that, if communicated, would create a clear and present danger of violence and physical harm; or
  • Correspondence that is in code or for which there is reasonable belief that a code is contained therein.

If correspondence is censored or rejected the inmate shall be informed of the action in writing by the Canteen Supervisor or designee, including a statement of why the correspondence is being censored and/or rejected [FCAC 12.03 FMJS 9.03].

Notice of censorship or rejection will also be provided via U.S. Mail to the sender/author within (5) business days by the Canteen Supervisor or designee.

  • The sender/author of the censored or rejected mail, within five (5) business days of receipt of the notification of the decision to censor or reject the item of mail, may protest the decision to censor or reject the subject item of mail to the Support Services Bureau Commander (SSBC) or designee. A protest may be made verbally or in writing. The protest should include the reasons why the item of mail should not be subject to censorship or rejection.
  • The SSBC or designee will review and respond to the protest within five (5) business days of receipt of the same.
  • If the original censorship or rejection is upheld by the SSBC or designee, the SSBC’s decision may be appealed to the Detention Center Director within five (5) business days. An appeal may be made verbally or in writing. The Detention Center Director will respond to the appeal within five (5) business days. The Detention Center Director’s decision on appeal is final.

Pod Attorney Booths Pass Through Slots

Effective May 15, 2017, the pass through slots located in the Pod Attorney Booths will no longer be utilized. The new procedure for requesting inmate signatures on documents will be as follows:

  • Documents may be dropped off Mon-Fri.
  • Any documents dropped off from 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. will be processed and ready for pick-up the same business day from 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
  • Any documents dropped off after 10:00 a.m. will be processed and ready for pick-up the next business day from 3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

*When exigent circumstances arise, the Watch Commander may approve the facilitation of action outside the above parameters.

Books and Subscriptions

All books and subscriptions must be soft backed and come directly from a publisher or book store. No hardback books or books containing staples will be accepted. Books and subscriptions must be paid for in advance and can not contain any nudity, profanity or advocate violence/hatred toward any individual, organization, religion or nation. Books and subscriptions can not contain instructions for the manufacturing of explosives, weapons, drugs, drug paraphernalia, alcoholic beverages, escapes paraphernalia, or to affect and/or facilitate an escape. Inmates may have a total of five (5) books per shipping order and are only allowed five (5) books in their possession at any given time.

Pictures

  • May be sent through the mail.
  • Inmates are allowed to have five (5) pictures.
  • Once the inmate is at their limit there are No Exchanges.
  • We will not accept pictures with nudity or sexually explicit material.
  • No Polaroid pictures accepted.

Mailing Address

Leon County Detention Center
Inmates name (SPN number if available)
Post Office Box 2278
Tallahassee, Florida 32316

Telephones

  • All calls from the Detention Center inmate will be Collect, Prepaid Collect, or Debit.
  • Prepaid Calling Assistance, call 888-506-8407 (Available 24 Hours 7 Days a Week).
  • Debit Deposit Accounts, call 888-888-8413 (Available 24 Hours 7 Days a Week)
  • If you wish to have your telephone number blocked to prevent collect calls or have the block removed from your telephone, you may come to the Detention Center Visitation Lobby and present valid picture identification and ownership of the telephone number.
  • We have provided for your usage a Pay-Phone located in the Visitation Lobby waiting area.
  • We do not take or give inmates messages unless there is a family emergency (critical condition in the hospital or death).

Religious Items

  • We no longer accept Religious Items to be dropped off at the Detention Center front lobby. The religious items must come directly from the publisher or a book store.

  • All items will be searched for contraband.

Detention Work Camp

Perhaps one of the best crime prevention programs is the Inmate Work Crew. This program began with the Sheriff's commitment to the taxpayers that inmates would be afforded the opportunity to pull their weight as citizens of Leon County. The program started with no money, equipment, tools or staff. Instead of allowing inmates to lay around the Detention Center
and be supported by tax dollars, the Sheriff devised a plan to let them help clean up our community for six to ten hours each day during a six day work week.

Out of this plan evolved multiple benefits to the community. Even the weekend sentenced inmates benefited from the program by completing their sentence on a fast track. The real crime prevention benefit comes from these work crews being seen working along roadways, in vacant lots, cleaning up graffiti, and picking up trash.

The Leon County Detention Center Work Crew operates Tuesday through Friday. Inmates sentenced to the Leon County Detention Center are screened and selected for outside work assignments and are assigned and supervised by County, City and Correctional Staff. Inmates leave each day from the Detention Center 0700 hours and return at 1630 hours.

The Leon County Detention Center Work Camp operates seven days a week. Inmates are sentenced to this program by the courts as a condition of their probation. Inmates are allowed to choose and sign up for days they want to work. They must work at least one day a week. Inmates report to the Leon County Detention Center Work Camp at 0630 hours, dress in Detention Center stripe uniforms and are assigned to and supervised by Leon County Sheriff's Office Correctional Staff. They are released each day at 1630 hours.

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Inmate Locator

Leon County FL Jail publishes the names of their inmates currently in their facility in Florida. Your search should start with this locator first to see if your loved one is there.

The second box is the InmateAid Inmate Search. This database of inmates is user-generated content for the purpose of accessing and utilizing any or all of the InmateAid services. If you need our assistance creating your own inmate profile to keep in touch, email us at aid@inmateaid.com and we will assist you in locating your inmate.

As a last resort, you might have to pay for that information if we do not have it. The Arrest Record Search will cost you a small amount, but their data is the freshest available and for that reason they charge to access it.

Visitation Information

Leon County Detention Center - Visitation

The Leon County Detention Center encourages visitation for the inmates incarcerated here. We firmly believe that ties to family and friends are extremely important. However, there are rules that we need to make you aware of so your visiting privileges are not denied, terminated or suspended.

Visitation Hours

Visitation hours are Monday through Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Visitation will resume again after official count and shift change and run from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Lobby Doors are open 8:00 a.m. through 8:00 p.m.

Visitation Rules

Starting on April 16, 2017
Inmates housed in pods N, O, P and Unit Five (5), may have video visitation with children 15 years old and under. Visitors 15 years old and younger must be accompanied by their parent or legal (court appointed) guardian at all times while in the video visitation area. The parent or legal guardian is responsible for the child’s conduct at all times. A certified copy of the birth certificate with the parents’ names on it is required on the first visit. Court appointed guardians need to bring the original court ordered paperwork signed by a Judge, which names them as the child’s guardian or notarized authorization of custody of child on their first visit. Only one child per adult is allowed to visit at a time per visit. At no time will the child be left unattended by an adult. The child must be listed on the inmate’s visitation card in order to visit. Visitors under the age of 16 are prohibited in all other housing areas.

During the admission process, the Booking Unit will enter (at least one, and up to five) visitor names chosen by the inmate, into the system for visitation. Requests for visitor changes will only be made the last calendar day of the month. Visitation Forms will be provided for the Pods the evening of the last day of each month. Each Inmate is allowed five (5) Thirty (30) minutes visits not to exceed 2 ½ hours per week. Inmates who are being confined in special housing pods are restricted to two (2) visits per day. Inmate visit times will not exceed two and one half (2 1/2) hours per week.

Individuals that are authorized visitors are only allowed to visit the designated inmate and will only be allowed to visit one inmate per day. Split visits (visits of more than one inmate) shall not be allowed and are grounds to have ALL visitation privileges revoked. All visitors must be at least 16 years of age to visit.

For security reasons inmates admitted to a hospital will not be permitted visitors unless approved by the Sheriff, the Detention Center Director or his/her designee.

  • There are no split-time visits.
  • You must see the inmate you sign in to see during your visit.
  • You may not return later that day to see a different inmate.
  • Profanity will not be tolerated. Any violation can result in permanent suspension.
  • No communications with working inmates in and around the facility as you pass by the perimeter fence.
  • Children under the age of 16 are not allowed on the premises without someone who is at least 16 years of age with them.
  • You may not leave your children unattended anytime or with other visitors.
  • If you leave your child unattended in a vehicle, your visitation will be suspended.
  • Leave all personal items other than car keys, locked inside your car.
  • Persons believed to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs will not be allowed to visit.
  • Cell phones are prohibited inside the Detention Center.

Security

Visitors must comply with standard security measures (metal detection devices etc.) prior to being permitted to enter the secure area of the Detention Center. Failure to comply and/or successfully pass these measures will prohibit the visitor from entering the Detention Center.

Visitors with medical or religious claims, which prohibit exposure to metal detector devices must provide the medical documentation if applicable. A supervisor shall review all medical/religious claims.

All Detention Facilities visitors must be dressed appropriately. Failure to comply with the following guidelines will result in denial of admission to this facility and/or suspension of the visit.

Visitors are NOT to wear garments which contain metal including underwire bras, or other items e.g. jewelry, hairpins, etc., as they may cause the metal detector to alert, and/or prevent their admission into the facility. When able, metal items should be removed prior to entering the Detention Center. All items shall be subject to further search.

Dress Code for Visitors

Visitors must remain properly dressed at all times. Visitors are prohibited from wearing:

  • Clothing that resembles a correctional employee (officer or civilian) uniform, such as all green or a green and brown skirt/pants and shirt combination.
  • Tight fitting, see-through, provocative and/or revealing clothing of any kind e.g., spandex, sheer, netting, torn or frayed attire, bathing suits, body suits, athletic shorts, hot pants and pajamas.
  • Tops that are cut low; reveal more than 2 inches of cleavage, more than 4 inches of the back, or any portion of the abdomen; halter tops, tube tops, tank tops, spaghetti straps, sleeveless/muscle shirts, strapless shirts.
  • Shorts should be no more than 1 inch above the knee e.g., micro/mini shorts.
  • Skirts and dresses should be no more than 1 inch above the knee e.g., micro/mini- skirts. Slits in skirts/dresses must not exceed mid-thigh when seated.
  • Non-prescription sunglasses

All visitors must wear shoes at all times. Visitors are encouraged to wear low footwear with sufficient traction. Flip-flops, bed room shoes, high heels more than 3 inches and sandals which are not secured to the ankle by at least one strap are prohibited.

The Shift Supervisor will make the final determination as to compliance with this policy and admission into the facility.

Out of Town Visitors

You are required to conform to our set forth Visitation Rules and Dress Code policy outlined above.

** Violation of Detention Center Visitation Rules may result in suspension of your visitation privileges. **

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Facility Type

Leon County FL Jail is run by the county sheriff’s department and the prison is run by the state department of corrections. Jail is for inmates who are awaiting time or who have been sentenced to less than a year. Prison is only available for people who have been sentenced to more than a year on any one charge.

Neither prison nor jail is nice but they differ in their levels of security, the programs they have and the quality of the environment. Additionally, an inmate cannot ask for a motion to reconsider once they have been transferred to the custody of the department of corrections.

The Sheriff’s department calculates what percentage of your jail time that you actually have to serve. The law requires that the sheriff’s department make people serve a minimum of 50% of their sentence if they are convicted of a misdemeanor.

The jail will accept inmates from the US Marshal and ICE where space is necessary. In comparison, state prison is for inmates serving lengthier sentences on crimes that are more severe in nature.

The Leon Sheriff’s Department calculates what percentage of a felony jail sentence a person will serve. The law requires that an inmate serve at least 85% of their felony jail sentence for non-mandatory time and 100% of their mandatory time.

Leon County FL Jail also offers and manages alternatives to jail such as work release programs, work furlough, house arrest, and private county jails where the person convicted can serve their sentences on weekends. Because overcrowding is a problem in both county jail and state prison, both systems operate a good behavior program. Those who are on good behavior can have their sentences reduced or cut.

If you are not serving a mandatory minimum sentence and you do not get into trouble while in jail the sheriff’s department will typically give automatic good behavior time. When you first receive your release date from the jail, within a few days of being incarcerated, the good time deduction will have already been included in most cases. For non-mandatory misdemeanor good time off is 50% and for felonies is typically about 10-15%.

Custody/Security Level

The Leon County FL Jail is located in Florida and takes in new arrests and detainees are who are delivered daily - call 850-922-3500 for the current roster. Law enforcement and police book offenders from Leon County and nearby cities and towns. Some offenders may stay less than one day or only for a few days until they are released in a court proceeding, some after putting up a bond and then are released to a pretrial services caseload under supervision by the court, or are released on their own recognizance with an agreement to appear in court.

The jail is divided into "pods," each of which includes individual cells, common areas, and an outside recreation court — a space bound by towering concrete walls. All meals, are approved by a dietitian. Common area tables are made of solid steel with attached four seats. Inmates crowd around the tables playing cards or board games like chess and checkers. Inside the cells, there is only a sliver of a window allows inmates to peer out. There are two to three inmates per cell, The jail is crowded at about 90 percent capacity and this population varies day-to-day sometimes over-crowded. There are a number of people who arrive at the jail actively or recently drunk or high, or arrive with injuries from fights/assaults that led to their arrest, and/or are mentally ill with no other place for law enforcement to deliver them. This makes the intake process challenging for the jail’s staff and its medical personnel.

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How To Send Things

There are strict procedures for everything related to "sending things to an inmate" in a County - medium facility. This includes sending money for commissary packages, sending mail like letters with photos, magazine subscriptions, buying phone time, postcards and greeting cards, and even distance learning courses (get your degree, you've got a lot of extra time). You also need to know about visitation, what are the hours and rules.

All of the information you could ever need to know is below, patiently scroll the page and get as much information about Leon County FL Jail that you'd ever want to know. If there is anything that you were looking for, but don't see, please email us at aid@inmateaid.com.

How To Send Money:

How to Send an Inmate Money in Florida

Here are some general guidelines for sending money to an inmate's trust account; but not specific to a particular facility, institution or jail. Inmates need money to access several privileges like weekly shopping at the commissary, making phone calls, using the email service where offered, using the electronic tablets where offered and paying their co-pay when needing the medical or dental services. Some county jails require a per-night fee for the jail’s expenses.

What is a Commissary?

A commissary is a store within the jail. Commissary day is usually held once a week and can only be used if the inmate has funds in their commissary account, like a bank account within the institution. If the inmate has a job, their paycheck is deposited into this account, too.

The Commissary sells various products that the inmates may purchase if they have money on their books. Items sold are clothing, shoes, snacks and food, as well as hygienic products like soap, shampoo, and shavers. The commissary also sells products like books, magazines, televisions, radios, playing cards, headphones, MP3 players, electronic tablets, songs and educational programming. They also sell paper, envelopes, and stamps allowing the inmate to write their loved ones, friends and family. Facilities will provide stamps and paper to inmates who are indigent – eligible where no money has been in their commissary account for at least 30 days.

How you send money to an inmate?

Sending money to an inmate varies from state to state, depending if it is county, state or federal, their ways of accepting money for inmates’ changes by the money transfer company they’ve contracted with. Federal Prisons and some state-level prisons have centralized banking systems which means that you do not need to know where they are specifically, just that they are in the state systems of for instance the California, Texas, Florida DOC or the FBOP to name a few.

How do I send money using MoneyGram?

Some facilities will allow you to deposit cash through the lobby window stand-alone kiosk in the lobby or visitation room. Most facilities will also accept a postal money order mailed to the institution’s inmate mailing address made payable to the full inmate’s name.

Electronic banking allows friends and family members to send the funds online, and correctional departments are starting to favor this method because it is less work for staff and more accurate/easier to keep track of, as well as being more convenient.

Regardless of the method of sending funds, there are several key things you will need to know:
• Inmate’s full committed name
• Inmate’s ID number
• Inmate’s location – or a system like the federal BOP

Before sending any funds you should find out what online transfer companies the institution your inmate is incarcerated in uses. You can find this information on our site by navigating to the facilities page click on the Money Transfer button under the address and phone number.

Pay close attention to the rules of the facility. Sometimes they will require money senders are on the inmate's visitation list. Some correctional facilities have a deposit limit, like $200-300 at a time, but in federal, there is no limit.

MoneyGram, JPay, OffenderConnect, AccessCorrections, JailATM, WU, Touchpayonline, tigercommissary, smartdeposit are some of the money transfer firms being used by various facilities. MoneyGram is by far the oldest and most trusted.

Who else can access the money you send?

An inmate with fines or restitution will be subject to commissary/trust account garnishment. If the inmate has these financial obligations, they will be extracted from the inmate’s bank account. It may be a percentage or the entire amount depending on the situation. We recommend inmates who are going into their bid contact the counselor and make an arrangement beforehand. If you go in knowing they are taking 20-25% of all deposits is better than have them take it all and you find out in the commissary line when the account is zero.

Why is my inmate asking for more than I normally send?

This is generally a signal that the inmate is doing something they shouldn’t and need money to get them out of or through a situation. It could be gambling, it could be extortion it could be other things you don’t need to know on this forum (for now). Set boundaries with your inmate. Tell them that “this is the amount I can send each month” and that is it. There are no extras beyond the boundary. Also, NEVER send money to the account of another inmate on your inmate’s instruction. This is a sign that something is not right. If the corrections people discover this, and they do more times than not, it will result in some severe disciplinary action to the inmate, and certainly the loss of all privileges.

Who can I call if I suspect something?

We recommend speaking with the counselor or case manager of the facility and use a generic reference in the event that your suspicions are wrong. You needn’t put them in a more difficult position if they are.

Inmate Care Packages:

How to Buy Inmate Commissary Care Packages Online

Show your loved one how much you care – order a package today! The facilities usually have a weekly limit of about $100 per inmate, plus processing and tax. The orders do NOT count towards the inmates weekly commissary allowances Deposits can be made online for inmates 24/7 using a credit/debit card

There are also a few services that allow you how to order inmate commissary online. These trusted providers are approved and share revenue with the prisons from the sales to the inmates.

Here is a list of other similar programs prison commissary: Keefe Group, Access Securpak, iCareGifts, Union Supply Direct, Walkenhorst's, CareACell

Inmate Commissary:

What is Inmate Commissary?

Prison commissary (also sometimes referred to as inmate canteen) is a store for inmates housed within a correctional facility. While the very most basics may be provided for by a given correctional department, there are also other important goods/services that Florida prisoners and inmates must buy. For instance, supplies such as supplementary food, female hygiene products, books, writing utensils and a plethora of other things are examples of things that can be purchased as part of an inmate commissary packages for goods.

What is an Inmate trust account?

When you add money to an inmate account, the prison funds are stored on an inmate trust fund. This prison account basically acts as a personal bank account of an inmate. They will use this account to make Inmate Calls, pay for postage to Send Photos from Inmates, send emails from inmates, purchase Items from Commissary, receive wages from jobs, and more.

How To Send Mail:

This is how to send your inmate at Leon County FL Jail letters, photos, postcards, greeting cards and magazines

Incoming and outgoing inmate mail is subject to inspection for the presence of contraband that might threaten the safety, security or well-being of the jail/facility, its staff, and residents. Inmates may receive only metered, unstamped, plain white postcards no larger than 4" x 6" as mail. Writing must be in pencil or blue or black ink. Any other mail will be returned to the sender. If no return address is available, unauthorized mail will be stored in the inmate's locker until the inmate's release.

Inmate mail cannot contain any of the following: Create an immediate threat to jail order by describing the manufacture of weapons, bombs, incendiary devices, or tools for escape that realistically are a danger to jail security; Advocate violence, racial supremacy or ethnic purity; No current inmate-to-inmate mail will be allowed and will be destroyed.

The easiest workaround is to look over the mailing services of InmateAid. We have an automated system for sending your loved one that special message or picture. We send thousands of pieces of mail per month with NO issues with the prisons or jails. The envelopes display the InmateAid logo, the mail room knows for certain that the contents will not be compromising. This trust was established in 2012.

How To Send Greeting Cards and Postcards:

Greeting cards are great for the holidays and birthdays. The ones from the store often have more than just the message because the policies surrounding appropriate content (no nudity or sexually suggestive material no matter how funny), and they cannot have glitter, stickers or anything else that makes the card different from a normal plain old card. Instead of going to the Hallmark store in the mall and looking around for hours - go to our easy to search Greeting Cards service.

It takes literally 45 seconds and it's very affordable for what you're getting (and what they are getting, too!). Select from 100s of birthday, anniversary and every holiday you can think of, and VERY easy to send from your phone on InmateAid:

Don't forget Christmas, Thanksgiving, Mother's Day, Father's Day, New Year's, Ramadan, Hanukkah, Passover, Easter, Kwanzaa or Valentine's Day!

In less than a minute and only $0.99, this act of kindness will be worth a million to your inmate. If you have a picture or two and don't want to write a long letter. Type out a little love in the message box and send your latest selfie... only 99 cents!

Don't wait until the moment has passed, it's easy and convenient to let them know you're thinking of them at every moment.

How To Send magazines and Books:

Send magazines to Leon County FL Jail at 535 Appleyard Drive
PO Box 2278, Tallahassee, FL

Send the best magazines and books to your Inmate in jail or prison, it's the gift that keeps on giving all year round, There is nothing more exciting to an inmate (besides their release date) than getting their favorite magazine every month at mail call.

Magazines and books must come directly from the publisher. You are not allowed to send single magazines in an envelope. They need to come directly from the publisher with your inmate's name affixed to the address label. Magazine subscriptions are easy to set up, it takes literally 2 minutes.

You know when you go into the grocery and browse the new magazines on display? You see hundreds. Inside they place a little card that if you fill it out and send it in with your inmate's name, ID number and facility address - you drop it in the mail and in 8-12 weeks your inmate gets an issue every month for a whole year. Thankfully, there is an easier way, just CLICK here and browse yourself. Select a title or two and add your inmate's name to the order. It's fast, it's reliable and it's at a discounted rate for your convenience.

How To Save Money on Inmate Calls

The prison phone companies have a monopoly at the facility they have a contract with. Profits are shared so there is no incentive for their representatives to show you how to save money. They post their rates and in almost every case, there are at least two pricing tiers. Depending on where you are and where your inmate is, the type of phone number you use will make all the difference.

In federal prison, the answer is simply that a new local number will change your inmate's call rate from $.21 per minute to only $.06 per minute. Fed gives you only 300 minutes per month, the local line service is only $8.95, no hidden fees or bundling of other unwanted service charges

For the other facilities that are not federal, it used to be that a local number was the answer. Now, its market intelligence and InmateAid has made it their business to know what the best deal is in every scenario. And we can tell you that in 30% of the cases, we cannot save you a penny - and neither can anyone else. But we will give you a refund if we can't save you money.

For more specific information on inmate calls, you will want to navigate to the facility your inmate is incarcerated in through our site by going to Prison Directory and following the links to the Discount Telephone Service - get an honest estimate before you buy.

Ask The Inmate

Ask a former inmate questions at no charge. The inmate answering has spent considerable time in the federal prison system, state and county jails, and in a prison that was run by the private prison entity CCA. Ask your question or browse previous questions in response to comments or further questions of members of the InmateAid community.

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